The Mystery of Aurora Borealis: What Causes It?

In summary, the Aurora Borealis is caused by charged particles from the Sun being deflected by the Earth's magnetic field and traveling down the lines of magnetic force to the poles. When these particles reach the ionosphere, they interact with the Solar wind, resulting in the colorful light displays known as the Northern Lights. Additional information on this topic can be found by visiting the provided link.
  • #1
Jack
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What causes the Aurora Borealis?
 
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  • #2
It's explained pretty well Here . Basically, the Sun emits particles (called the Solar Wind) which the Earth's magnetic field deflects away from the surface. But at the poles, that magnetic field "curves downward" and comes into direct contact with the surface. Charged particles from the Sun can ride down these nearly vertical lines of magnetic force. As these particles reach the ionosphere, the charges in that layer of the atmosphere interct with the charge in the Solar wind, giving off visible light, radio static, etc.
 
  • #3
Originally posted by LURCH
It's explained pretty well Here . Basically, the Sun emits particles (called the Solar Wind) which the Earth's magnetic field deflects away from the surface. But at the poles, that magnetic field "curves downward" and comes into direct contact with the surface. Charged particles from the Sun can ride down these nearly vertical lines of magnetic force. As these particles reach the ionosphere, the charges in that layer of the atmosphere interct with the charge in the Solar wind, giving off visible light, radio static, etc.

Has anyone else got some cool info on this topic!
 

Related to The Mystery of Aurora Borealis: What Causes It?

What is Aurora Borealis?

Aurora Borealis, also known as the Northern Lights, is a natural light display in the Earth's sky, predominantly seen in the high-latitude regions. It is caused by the interaction of solar winds with the Earth's magnetic field and atmosphere.

What causes Aurora Borealis?

Aurora Borealis is caused by the collision of charged particles from the Sun, also known as solar winds, with the Earth's magnetic field. As the particles enter the Earth's atmosphere, they collide with gases such as oxygen and nitrogen, causing them to emit light and creating the beautiful colors of the Northern Lights.

Where can Aurora Borealis be seen?

Aurora Borealis can be seen in the high-latitude regions, such as the Arctic and Antarctic regions, as well as in countries located near the Earth's magnetic poles, including Canada, Norway, and Iceland.

Why does Aurora Borealis appear in different colors?

The different colors of Aurora Borealis are caused by the type of gas particles that are being excited by the solar winds. Oxygen particles typically emit green and red light, while nitrogen particles emit blue and purple light. The altitude at which the collision occurs also affects the color of the Northern Lights.

Can Aurora Borealis be predicted?

While the occurrence of Aurora Borealis can be predicted based on solar activity, it is not possible to predict the exact timing and location of the phenomenon. However, there are apps and websites that provide aurora forecasts based on solar wind and geomagnetic data, which can increase the chances of seeing the Northern Lights.

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