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The new defiention of a planet!

  1. pluto & charon is a double planet

    4 vote(s)
    22.2%
  2. ceres is a planet

    2 vote(s)
    11.1%
  3. 2003 UB<sub>313 </sub> is a planet

    3 vote(s)
    16.7%
  4. Pluto & charon is not a double planet

    4 vote(s)
    22.2%
  5. Pluto is not a planet

    7 vote(s)
    38.9%
  6. ceres is not a planet

    7 vote(s)
    38.9%
  7. 2003 UB<sub>313</sub> is not a planet

    2 vote(s)
    11.1%
  8. It should be kept the same

    3 vote(s)
    16.7%
  9. other(please explain)

    2 vote(s)
    11.1%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Aug 16, 2006 #1
    IAU

    I'm ok with Pluto and Charon being a planet and 2003 UB313but crers? what were they thinking!
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2006
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 16, 2006 #2

    SpaceTiger

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    What a strange poll. Your options #3 and #7 appear to be identical.
     
  4. Aug 16, 2006 #3
    OK... so how many planets are there now? The definition still seems like quite a mess >_<
     
  5. Aug 16, 2006 #4
    woops it should say it's not a planet
     
  6. Aug 16, 2006 #5
    12
    and 10 chars for this post
    Here's a nice picture
     
    Last edited: Aug 16, 2006
  7. Aug 16, 2006 #6
    Criterion 3 says "as are one or more recently discovered large trans-neptunian objects"... so how many of those are we talking about? And how large is large? Are Sedna and Quaoar counted as planets?
     
  8. Aug 16, 2006 #7
    Maybe 12 are being conisder here's a picture of them:
    http://www.iau2006.org/mirror/www.iau.org/iau0601/large/iau0601c.jpg
     
  9. Aug 16, 2006 #8

    LURCH

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    Depends on whom you ask. According to this article;

    http://space.com/scienceastronomy/060816_planet_definition.html


    Mike Brown (discoverer of the 12th planet) puts the current count at 53 objects which would satisfy the new definition, "with countless more to be discovered".
     
  10. Aug 23, 2006 #9
    A planet is a body that is big enough to have cleared all significantly sized objects in similar orbits out of its orbit around a star. Mercury to neptune have managed to do this. pluto is one of many smaller objects moving in their own orbits like the minor planets and is such a minor planet or asteroid. Pluto/charon is also I believe in an orbit with a gravitational resonance with Neptune so it is in some way a very loosely coupled satellite of Neptune.

    Most astronomers had considered this to be likely since it was discovered but had not put the effort into looking for other similar objects. Recent interest in near earth orbit objects and telescope technology and automation has made the search for small faint slow moving objects much easier, so expect lots more to be found in the next few years.
     
  11. Aug 24, 2006 #10
  12. Aug 24, 2006 #11

    marcus

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    Dearly Missed

  13. Aug 24, 2006 #12

    ohwilleke

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    The category pluton is in, but the name pluton is out.

    Also, the "small solar system bodies" name (even SSSBs for short) reeks of the suckitude that comes from having astronomers with no sense of creativity, joy or liberal arts educations.

    So, what would be better names:

    For Plutons

    Demoids? (from Demon on the Neptune, Pluto, Charon theme).
    Plutoroids? (from Pluto and Asteroid)
    Pegasi? (Pegasus, the flying horse, was a child of Neptune).
    Chtons? (For the Chthonic dieties who inhabit the underworld).

    For Minor Solar System Bodies

    Apollites? (from Apollo god of the Sun)
     
  14. Aug 24, 2006 #13

    marcus

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    the BBC article
    http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/5282440.stm
    said that things like Pluto will not be called "plutons" (that's a geology term already) but instead they
    will be officially known as DWARF PLANETS
    I don't think that is especially elegant or imaginative nomenclature and it looks like ohwilleke isn't happy with it either.


    So I propose those smaller bodies out around and beyond Neptune should be DOLPHINS
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2006
  15. Aug 24, 2006 #14

    ohwilleke

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    Resolution 6 of the IAU, in addition the the main resolution 5 (about planet and dwarf planet status) says that in addition to the dwarf planet designation that dwarf planets like Pluto. Thus, the pluton thing will stay.
     
  16. Aug 25, 2006 #15

    George Jones

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