The past is slowing becoming popular

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In summary, the radio recently discussed why people are moving to the countryside in the UK. The main argument is that the modern world lacks a sense of true living, with everything being done for us. People in cities are feeling unfulfilled and want to live a simpler life by growing their own food and living without electricity. However, it is important to note that this migration is mainly made up of successful couples in their 30s-50s looking for a change of pace and a picturesque setting. Additionally, it is worth questioning the true decline of rural communities, as well as considering the traditional British attitude of homeownership and the continuous growth of urban areas. In the end, it seems to be a personal preference for many individuals as to
  • #1

Gandalf

I heard a recent slot on the radio discussing why people are moving to the country(UK). The anwser is something that i have argued time and time again, that todays world has no life. Everything is done for us. People living in cities are saying that they feel as though something is missing. They want to grow their own food, and live without electricity. Does anybody agree that the wild life is the right life!?
 
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  • #2
Originally posted by Gandalf
I heard a recent slot on the radio discussing why people are moving to the country(UK). The anwser is something that i have argued time and time again, that todays world has no life. Everything is done for us. People living in cities are saying that they feel as though something is missing. They want to grow their own food, and live without electricity. Does anybody agree that the wild life is the right life!?

Hm. Are you sure that these people moving in the country are going to live without electricity and grow their own food? From what I've heard and seen, the migration from the cities tends to be made up of successful couples in the 35-50 bracket looking to settle down and capitalise on the fact that their moderately sized flat in London can be sold for enough money to buy a big house with picturesque scenery in the countryside.

Also, it's worth asking why, if people are indeed moving to the countryside in ever greater numbers, country villages and communities are dying on their feet, shrinking at an alarming rate as well as having all their local services such as post offices withdrawn.

I'd say it's more a symptom of the attitudes in the UK towards where you live. Living in a flat or apartment has never had the same cachet or as desirable in the UK as it has in, say, urbanised areas of France. For the British public the aim seems to be, as it has been since the industrial revolution, by and large to own your own house, with flats and apartments being seen primarily as a temporary situation whilst you're building your nest egg. If more people are moving into the countryside, I'd suggest it was because of this attitude combined with the rapid continuous growth of Britain's urban areas since the 50's. More people are leaving to go to the countryside because they were part of a massive population influx into the cities through birth or migration in the 70's and 80's.

That's not to say that the countryside doesn't rock, but I love the city as well (although I am fortunate to live in what is officially the greenest and friendliest city in the country ). Whilst I'm still young I'll stick to the city, but I don't think anyone is mad enough to want to be stuck in the middle of London when they're in their 60's!
 
  • #3


While it's true that some people are choosing to move to the countryside in search of a simpler, more self-sufficient lifestyle, I don't believe that the past is necessarily becoming more popular. In fact, many advancements and conveniences of modern society have greatly improved our quality of life.

However, I do agree that there is a growing desire for a more balanced and meaningful way of living. In today's fast-paced, technology-driven world, it's easy to become disconnected from nature and our own sense of self. The allure of living off the land and being more in tune with the natural world is certainly understandable.

But I don't think it's fair to say that modern life has no life. It's all about finding a healthy balance and incorporating elements from both the past and present into our lives. We can still embrace the benefits of technology and city living while also making time for nature and self-sufficiency.

Ultimately, the right way of life is a personal preference and what works best for each individual. Some may thrive in the wild, while others find fulfillment in the hustle and bustle of city life. It's important to respect and support each other's choices and find our own version of a fulfilling and purposeful life.
 

What is meant by "The past is slowing becoming popular"?

This phrase refers to the current trend of people becoming more interested in historical events, cultures, and traditions. It suggests that there is a growing fascination with the past and a desire to learn more about it.

Why do you think the past is becoming more popular now?

There are a few possible reasons for this trend. One is that technology has made it easier to access information and resources about the past. Additionally, people may be seeking a sense of connection and identity by exploring their own personal histories and the histories of their ancestors.

What are some examples of how the past is becoming popular?

One example is the popularity of historical and period dramas in film and television. Another is the rise of genealogy and ancestry research, as well as the increasing interest in cultural traditions and customs from different time periods.

What are the potential benefits of this trend?

By studying the past, we can learn valuable lessons and gain a deeper understanding of our present society. It also allows us to preserve and honor important historical events, cultures, and traditions. Additionally, exploring the past can be a source of entertainment and inspiration.

Are there any drawbacks to the past becoming popular?

One potential drawback is the risk of romanticizing or idealizing certain aspects of the past without acknowledging the negative aspects. This can lead to a distorted view of history and perpetuate harmful stereotypes or biases. It's important to approach the past with a critical and open-minded perspective.

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