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A The position-dependent mass

  1. Jul 24, 2016 #1
    Hello, I have some trouble understanding the position-dependent mass concept in classical mechanics especially with the lagrangian equation and the relation with the harmonic oscillator. Is there a person can provide a brief on the subject?.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 24, 2016 #2

    vanhees71

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    I have no clue what you mean by "position-dependent mass concept". It doesn't make any sense to me anyway, but do you have a reference?
     
  4. Jul 24, 2016 #3
    I upload paper related to this topic and there is more but I couldn't understand them.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. Jul 24, 2016 #4

    vanhees71

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    Ok, that's a funny mathematical study. I've no clue, where this is used to describe real physical systems. So what are your specific questions concerning the paper?
     
  6. Jul 24, 2016 #5
    And this talk about this term in classical and quantum.
     

    Attached Files:

  7. Jul 24, 2016 #6
    I want to know the meaning of "position-dependent mass", also why and where we use it?
     
  8. Jul 24, 2016 #7

    vanhees71

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    As I said, I have no clue, where in physics this idea is applied. It looks to me as if this is a purely mathematical exercise. Perhaps other forum members are more knowledgeable about this subject.
     
  9. Jul 24, 2016 #8
    Thank you for paying attention.
     
  10. Jul 24, 2016 #9
    I read in Professor Roger Penrose's book "The Road To Reality" in section 20 dealing with gravity's role in quantum state reduction that the total gravitational energy of two masses is different when they are separated than when closer together. So would this mean that in this case greater energy means greater mass?
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2016
  11. Jul 24, 2016 #10

    jtbell

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    Yes, but that's different from what Ibrahim Mustafa is asking about.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2016
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