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The rate of change of pressure

  1. Jul 20, 2004 #1
    URGENTThe rate of change of pressure

    Our problem is that we measured the rate of change of pressure of a liquid at different length of a pipe, for example, x=0, x=5cm, ... etc, caused by a pump at x=0-15cm=-15cm and got a result that at x=0, dP1/dt1 = -dP2/dt2, where dP1 is the pressure difference over a fixed interval, del t1, and dP2 is the pressure difference over a fixed interval, del t2,
    i.e. -----------
    - -
    - -
    del t1 |3 minutes | del t2
    (just like a trapezium without the bottom part), and del t1=del t2. Pumping power is decreasing from t=0 to t=4minutes and pumping power =0 when t>4 minutes.
    Is it accurate if we try to explain this observation as follows:
    Due to conservation of momentum, the rate of momentum-changing force per unit area, dP1/dt, produced by the pump is balanced by an equivalent negative rate of momentum-changing force per unit area, -dP2/dt produced by the system after 3 minutes at x=0.
    dP1/dt=-dP2/dt, where dP1 is the pressure changes over a fixed interval of time (del t1) and dP2 is the pressure changes over another fixed interval of time (del t2) at x=0, and del t1 = del t2.

    Thank you very much for your kind assistance.


    Sarah
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 20, 2004 #2
    I have this feeling of deja vu that I cannot quite get over. I have no idea why. How odd.
     
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