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Job Skills The Story of a Boy

  • Thread starter Zap
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Zap

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I've been posting here routinely during my master's program and during my job search. It was a very stressful and uncertain time. I would just like it to be known that I got into a data science and analytics training program during which I will receive a weekly stipend. Afterwards, I will interview for and presumably start a position in data science and analytics at the company that sponsors the training.

I do not want to post a lot of troubling information about lack of job prospects and disappear from the forum like many others. Indeed, we can find employment with a physics degree. I am a little apprehensive about this program, because the stipend is small and I've not actually been given a job offer yet, but I am willing to take the risk. As physicists, I think our primary asset is mathematical skills, which a lot of employers value and is applicable to a wide range of different fields.

I think it is true that you can do anything with a physics degree. However, the point people fail to mention is that it's definitely not easy. It may be harder to get into whatever field you decide do than with a specialized degree. Nevertheless, it can be done. I believe that what matters more than your degree, your grades, your experience or what skills you have to offer, is the individual, you your self. It doesn't matter what degree or title or certificate or stamp you get. You are still you. That's all you ever had. I've definitely not made it, yet. My goal is to become rich.
 
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Sadly, so many folks who desire to be rich and become so are not very happy.

There's a meme on poverty that succinctly summarizes it:

Poverty exists not because we can't help the poor, but because we can't satisfy the rich.
 

Zap

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Well, due to the student loan thing, I don't have much of an option other than try to become rich. However, your perception of rich may be more extravagant than mine. I've been poor pretty much my whole life. I can tell you that friends bring more joy than money, but not having money will make you the loneliest person on the planet, especially as a man. You can see that in homeless people. They are obviously not happy.

I don't know why this happened. I'd like to say it was hard work and determination, but I've no idea why. I sent the same resume I had sent out to 300 different people. I was still awkward during the interview. This time, it just happened to work out. I think, for whatever reason, they wanted to help me. I think we all need some help starting out, and a lot of luck. For some reason, I got lucky.

I am super excited!
 
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Its funny you mentioned using the same resume. I always counsel students to customize their resume to the job they’re applying to and to keep a copy should they get an interview.

It really works if you tell the prospective employer what they want to hear from the skills you have.

I know students hate this approach because its more work but its what you have to do to prevent getting lumped with all the other resumes they get.

I’m glad things are working out for you and foresee a great future for you.
 

Zap

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I tailored my resume for a specific job and applied to 300 of them.

I had tried tailoring my resume to each and every job post in the past, but I didn't receive good results from that. Making one good resume for a specific job and responding to a massive amount of job openings for that specific job in a short amount of time gave me good results.

Even if I had not received this job, I got more interviews the week following that massive resume dump than two years of carefully applying and considering each and every job post, resume and cover letter I sent out.

The job I got was based off of an assessment test. However, I think my resume may have helped me stand out.

Thank you.
 
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Attributed variously to Sophie Tucker, Pearl Bailey, Mae West and probably others:
Honey, I been rich and I been poor—and believe me, rich is better.
Also, they say that money can't buy happiness, but it can buy chocolate and that's a close second
 

symbolipoint

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I tailored my resume for a specific job and applied to 300 of them.

I had tried tailoring my resume to each and every job post in the past, but I didn't receive good results from that. Making one good resume for a specific job and responding to a massive amount of job openings for that specific job in a short amount of time gave me good results.

Even if I had not received this job, I got more interviews the week following that massive resume dump than two years of carefully applying and considering each and every job post, resume and cover letter I sent out.

The job I got was based off of an assessment test. However, I think my resume may have helped me stand out.

Thank you.
Doing some of both is what you want and maybe did. You had one basic resume for the jobs you want and then, as you determined for each job to apply-for, customized from your basic resume. At least you knew what you wanted first. Not always easy to decide which adjustments to make. I am just curious, if you used more of a functional resume, or more of a chronological resume.
 

Joshy

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My stipends were small, but my offers were more than quadruple- I've definitely paid off my student loans.

I agree with customizing from a basic resume, but it doesn't hold me back from making major changes and saving an extra copy should the application demand it. 300 jobs sounds to me really ambitious.
 

Zap

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I don't know how many jobs I applied to. It was more than likely between 100 - 200. Once I targeted data analytics, I found so many openings, it was easy to apply to 30 jobs in one day, with the same resume. Overall, from the time I started looking for jobs, two and a half years ago, until now, I sent out over 300 applications.

I had rewritten my resume a bunch of times during my job search. The final form was very basic. I was straight to the point, and didn't clutter it up with a skills section, summary or anything that was too wordy. People don't really want to read through that.

Instead of a skills section, I included some details on the subjects I studied in school under my education, like Python, SQL, R and AI along with specific subject matter, and included other skills I gained under my job experience, like statistical analysis on experimental and synthetic data, Microsoft Excel, presenting figures of results, forming hypothesis, etcetera.

I listed precisely what was necessary and relevant, and a few extra things, like my teaching and tutoring experience, but I kept that short. I think it's better to have something short, straight forward and right to the point and maintain a decent amount of white space and not have to mess with the outside margins. That way, it is more readable.

I also experimented with different fonts and combining several fonts. That's probably not necessary, but it actually looked really nice once I found something that actually worked. I combined Cambria with Source Sans Pro and Source Sans Pro Semi-Bold. I didn’t go full bold on anything. I used the sans for titles and the serif for long strings of words. It looked pretty clean, and I received several compliments on it. It was definitely professional and readable, even though I used two fonts.

Even though I had a decent amount of coding experience prior to the miracle of finding a job, I got and still have the impression that most of the employers were more interested in my mathematical and problem solving ability than my coding ability. So far, it seems as though data analytics doesn’t involve very much coding, but you should be math savvy and able to solve complex problems, if you want to move up to be a big boy data scientist. You also should be business savvy. It requires a lot of skills you don’t get with any degree.

I think the hardest thing is to decide what exactly you want to do, but once you can focus on a specific target and keep shooting, eventually you'll get lucky, assuming you are at least somewhat qualified. The good news is that we as physicists are at least somewhat qualified for a lot of stuff.

So, I am in a training program sponsored by a consulting company. When I finish the training, I will start as an associate data analyst. So, the training is more geared toward data analytics than data science, but does have some time devoted to data science. For example, we get to meet with one of the first data scientists, who started working in the field around 15 years ago. It is so cool. The salary they told me I would be getting as an entry level analyst is very competitive.

85-100k

I can't believe it. Once I gain some business expertise, it is very possible to move up to data scientist. I could also potentially go into data engineering, as well. From there, who knows. There are jobs being created everywhere from this data stuff. Even more jobs with weirder titles are bound to be created in the future. I feel blessed. I feel great. I can't wait to start my professional career.
 
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Dont limit your career! Think manager then CEO then retiring on a beach.

Oh wait, its a retirement community with a Hawaiian theme. Close enough though.
 

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