The truth owners

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  • Thread starter Burnsys
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  • #26
Burnsys said:
... i can imagine that NBC has a hierarchical order, what i think is that NBC10 director or top manager is apointed by someone of more range in the New york office, who is acountable for everything that appen in NBC10, of course they are going to "Promote" to higher ranks to those who share the main editorial line. and this is about the critical subjects, like war, economi, elections.. the rest is random fill with unimportant news...

I don't think you need to be from the US to know that corporations have written and unwritten rules that employees need to follow, unless they want to be serving cheeseburgers for a living. Except with the benefit of hindsight, the maverick isn't usually very popular with colleagues. Lets face it, most people would rather just pay the bills than do the right thing, and anyone who challenges the status quo is a threat to all of that. Sometimes the maverick becomes the hero, but this is usually in hindsight. People who challenge beliefs are usually considered a pain in the ass, whether they are right or wrong.
 
  • #27
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Locrian said:
Those are not actually banks (as the word is used in the US), but are instead investment firms. The reason those firms own a particular company is because investors have asked them to purchase that particular company for them. If the investor took his money out, the firm would then sell the share. Therefore, calling those companies owners of the stock would be misleading; in fact, they are just holders, the real owners are a much larger and diverse group.

Of course, this brings up another possibly interesting topic: how much control do shareholders have? Obviously they get to vote (see ya Eisner), but how much control does someone who is investing through a mutual fund his company offers have? This is another option the original writer of the posted article could have taken, but I suspect the details are beyond him.

The reason you are having trouble finding the stock holder's names is because the list is enormously long. I suspect a few people own large shares and would love to find out who they are, but it is still a long enough list to miss mainstream attention.

Overall, I still find the original conjecture - that the media is owned and controlled by few parties - extremely difficult to accept. For reasons Russ has given it is difficult to control. For reasons I've given it is difficult to own. A much stronger case would need to be made than has been presented.

I understand.. but, who apoint the CEO? how this enormously long list of people chose the CEO?? or only the few who own most of the shares can vote??? in that case, is anyway to know who are the responsables for the Corporation policy?? or we have to blindly belive someone or a group of people we will never know who they are?????

Anyway the ceo has the final autorithy operatively, (Not including the shareholders) i think its administer like any corporation, IBM; or Exxon for example has no trouble controling his coproration all around the world...
 
  • #28
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the number 42 said:
I haven't seen the video, but if anyone has a link...?

The attitude that stood out from the transcript was O'Reilly's. I thought it sounded pretty insulting that he used 'respect for the memory of Glick's father' as an excuse to shut Glick up.

Video: http://www.thoughtcrimenews.com/oreilly.wmv [Broken]
 
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  • #29
russ_watters
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Burnsys said:
Anyway the ceo has the final autorithy operatively, (Not including the shareholders) i think its administer like any corporation, IBM; or Exxon for example has no trouble controling his coproration all around the world...
Heh - have you ever had a job of any kind? Do you own any stock? You're missing some very, very basic concepts about how businesses work.

And even setting that aside, you're missing something pretty key about the relationship between the networks and the affiliates: the network doesn't own all of its affiliates. For example: http://www.sbgi.net/business/markets/all.shtml [Broken] owns several dozen TV stations including Fox, ABC, NBC, WB, and UPN affiliates (which is, of course, why they are called affiliates.

Also, Disney owns ABC, but it only owns a small handful of ABC tv stations - Sinclair owns 8 of them.
 
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  • #30
russ_watters
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Burnsys said:
Video: http://www.thoughtcrimenews.com/oreilly.wmv [Broken]
I watched it - and its understandable that O'Reilly would be upset with the guy. He really is a kook. He needs therapy. My guess is that the trauma of 9/11 worked a screw loose in his head.

And its O'Reilley's show! He gets to say when to cut the guy's mike. In fact, this is evidence that there is not central control from Fox: O'Reilly himself is the one who directed the interview and when he lost control of the course of the interview, he decided to end it (as is the usual thing to do).
 
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  • #31
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russ_watters said:
Heh - have you ever had a job of any kind? Do you own any stock? You're missing some very, very basic concepts about how businesses work.

And even setting that aside, you're missing something pretty key about the relationship between the networks and the affiliates: the network doesn't own all of its affiliates. For example: http://www.sbgi.net/business/markets/all.shtml [Broken] owns several dozen TV stations including Fox, ABC, NBC, WB, and UPN affiliates (which is, of course, why they are called affiliates.

Also, Disney owns ABC, but it only owns a small handful of ABC tv stations - Sinclair owns 8 of them.

Yes i have worked since i was 17, and i am working now. i don't own any stock... but what i know from working is that you always have a boss, you always have to "Follow the rules" and obey your boss. unless you have your own network..

About the networks ans the affiliates, i was looking at sinclair web site, what they do is only the broadcasting service? like transmiting the signal?? or they are responsable for the edition and content of the news???

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russ_watters said:
I watched it - and its understandable that O'Reilly would be upset with the guy. He really is a kook. He needs therapy. My guess is that the trauma of 9/11 worked a screw loose in his head.

And its O'Reilley's show! He gets to say when to cut the guy's mike. In fact, this is evidence that there is not central control from Fox: O'Reilly himself is the one who directed the interview and when he lost control of the course of the interview, he decided to end it (as is the usual thing to do).

what exaclty of glick interview make you belive he is a kook???

I know, it's o reilley's show, i never say there is a control room.. but like in any job, the corporation decide wich employes they hire... they even do you psicological test to get a job. if o'reilley didn't fit with they requeriments they will never give him the show...
 
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  • #32
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Burnsys said:
I understand.. but, who apoint the CEO? how this enormously long list of people chose the CEO?? or only the few who own most of the shares can vote???

Anyway the ceo has the final autorithy operatively, (Not including the shareholders) i think its administer like any corporation, IBM; or Exxon for example has no trouble controling his coproration all around the world...

Aparently you are unfamiliar with the idea of a Board of Directors.

I don't mean to be rude, but your statements in the past few posts have suggested you are ignorant about the way corporations work. These questions you ask ("who appoint the CEO") are not deep philosophical issues, but (usually) straightforward matters that are well known to anyone with any understanding of US business.

Would you not agree that these kinds of failures to gather even the most basic knowledge about business practice would be an impediment to forming a reasonable opinion on the matter? I'd like to humbly suggest you give up all arguments in this thread, go expand your knowlege base dramatically, and then reform your opinions. Even if you come to the same conclusions you will have greatly improved the strength of your stance on these issues.

Are there too few media outlets? How compacent is the media? Who has too much power over what they say? Is collusion between the board and CEO's acceptable? Are the laws in place to prevent it enough?

These seem to me to be reasonable questions. However, neither you nor the person you initially quoted seem the least bit equipped to answer them.
 
  • #33
russ_watters
And its O'Reilley's show! He gets to say when to cut the guy's mike. In fact, this is evidence that there is not central control from Fox: O'Reilly himself is the one who directed the interview and when he lost control of the course of the interview, he decided to end it (as is the usual thing to do).
Russ, your support of O'Reilly speaks volumes about your political views. I'm just glad you're not the moderator of this forum. Evidence that there is not central control at Fox? Can anybody but O'Reilly be called the 'kook?' What are you talking about?
 
  • #34
russ_watters
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Burnsys said:
Yes i have worked since i was 17, and i am working now. i don't own any stock... but what i know from working is that you always have a boss, you always have to "Follow the rules" and obey your boss. unless you have your own network..
Then you know that just having rules (even written rules, much less unwritten ones) does not mean everyone will follow them. There are plenty of examples where reporters have been fired for the content of their reports - vitually always its because the content was fabricated. What's more, these unwritten rules you are alleging require judgement calls: the local affiliate would have to somehow know (with perfect accuracy) that the stories it is reporting would be acceptable to the network. That's really, really thin. And we know for a fact that different tv stations will often make different judement calls: see the recent pulling of "Saving Private Ryan" from several affiliates for profanity reasons.
About the networks ans the affiliates, i was looking at sinclair web site, what they do is only the broadcasting service? like transmiting the signal?? or they are responsable for the edition and content of the news???
Both. Each affiliate transmits both its own content and re-transmits network content. For example, in Philadelphia every TV network has a 6:00 news, which is done by local reporters, and a 6:30 news, which is a re-transmission of the national news from the network. Most of the other daytime content is re-transmissions of network programming. News is by far the biggest piece of the local content that a TV station produces.
what exaclty of glick interview make you belive he is a kook???
His predilection toward paranoid conspiracy theory. I'm not a psrink, but from what I understand, that is not an uncommon result of emotional trauma: he isn't thinking rationally.
I know, it's o reilley's show, i never say there is a control room.. but like in any job, the corporation decide wich employes they hire... they even do you psicological test to get a job. if o'reilley didn't fit with they requeriments they will never give him the show...
Certainly thats true, but again, you are implying that the network somehow knew with absolute certainty how O'Reilly would act in any given circumstance. That's just absurd. Selection of the reporter sets the tone of the show and that's about it.

And actually, there is a control room - but the control room didn't end the interview. What does that tell you?
kcballer21 said:
Russ, your support of O'Reilly speaks volumes about your political views.
Thou dost assume too much: that short video clip constitutes the sum total of all the O'Reilly Factor I have ever watched. I am not a fan of sensationalist journalism, whatever the source and political leanings, and as such, I don't watch Fox news. Have a look at one of the 'where are you politically' threads - I am actually very close to the middle politically. This forum, in fact, leans heavily to the left. As I have said before: from the far left, the center looks like the right.
Can anybody but O'Reilly be called the 'kook?' What are you talking about?
This:
O'Reilly: You are mouthing a far left position that is a marginal position in this society...
This is factually true. In fact, only a very small minority of the population did not support our invasion of Afghanistan. Upwards of 90% did: http://edition.cnn.com/2001/COMMUNITY/10/23/gen.newport/
http://www.cbsnews.com/htdocs/pdf/war_poll.pdf
Even when Clinton attacked Afghanistan, support for the attacks was high:
http://www.cnn.com/ALLPOLITICS/1998/08/21/strike.poll/
And despite a single misleading report (copied over and over) to the contrary, the world supported it as well.

and this:
O'Reilly: All right. You didn't support the action against Afghanistan to remove the Taliban. You were against it, OK.
Glick: Why would I want to brutalize and further punish the people in Afghanistan...
O'Reilly: Who killed your father!
Glick: The people in Afghanistan...
O'Reilly: Who killed your father.
Glick: ... didn't kill my father.
O'Reilly: Sure they did. The al Qaeda people were trained there.
Glick: The al Qaeda people? What about the Afghan people?
He won't even acknowledge that al Qaeda, based in Afghanistan, was responsible for his father's death. That implies to me a severe disconnect from reality.
 
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  • #35
russ_watters said:
I watched it - and its understandable that O'Reilly would be upset with the guy. He really is a kook. He needs therapy. My guess is that the trauma of 9/11 worked a screw loose in his head.

And its O'Reilley's show! He gets to say when to cut the guy's mike. In fact, this is evidence that there is not central control from Fox: O'Reilly himself is the one who directed the interview and when he lost control of the course of the interview, he decided to end it (as is the usual thing to do).

:rofl: Which clip were you watching, Russ? I thought Glick showed amazing restraint. How would you deal with someone pointing their finger in your face, shouting at you, telling you to shut up, and implying that your words were insulting to your recently deceased father? I would would like to think that I would have given it right back to O'Reilly, with a bit on top. Then again, when you are recently bereaved as Glick was you are not in your usual state of mind, that's true. Maybe that explains why he didn't react to the insults.
 
  • #36
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russ_watters said:
Then you know that just having rules (even written rules, much less unwritten ones) does not mean everyone will follow them. There are plenty of examples where reporters have been fired for the content of their reports - vitually always its because the content was fabricated. What's more, these unwritten rules you are alleging require judgement calls: the local affiliate would have to somehow know (with perfect accuracy) that the stories it is reporting would be acceptable to the network. That's really, really thin. And we know for a fact that different tv stations will often make different judement calls: see the recent pulling of "Saving Private Ryan" from several affiliates for profanity reasons.

Ok, not everyone follow the rules, but you can't deny that every news station has a political line, for example, i have never seen a critic to bush in FOX news neither pro enviromental news.. i think it's their policy.. ,
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"An email sent to Jim Romenesko's for posting on the message board of the journalism training center, The Poynter Institute by former Fox News producer, Charlie Reina, explained how bias permeates the Fox newsroom. "The roots of Fox News Channel's day-to-day on-air bias are actual and direct. They come in the form of an executive memo distributed electronically each morning, addressing what stories will be covered and, often, suggesting how they should be covered. To the newsroom personnel responsible for the channel's daytime programming, The Memo is the bible. If, on any given day, you notice that the Fox anchors seem to be trying to drive a particular point home, you can bet The Memo is behind it," he wrote. "

"One day this past spring, just after the U.S. invaded Iraq, The Memo warned us that anti-war protesters would be 'whining' about U.S. bombs killing Iraqi civilians, and suggested they could tell that to the families of American soldiers dying there. Editing copy that morning, I was not surprised when an eager young producer killed a correspondent's report on the day's fighting - simply because it included a brief shot of children in an Iraqi hospital."

""These are not isolated incidents at Fox News Channel, where virtually no one of authority in the newsroom makes a move unmeasured against management's politics, actual or perceived. At the Fair and Balanced network, everyone knows management's point of view, and, in case they're not sure how to get it on air, The Memo is there to remind them." [4] (http://poynter.org/forum/?id=thememo)

"Reina mentioned an example affecting a story allocated to him. "It was, I would say, about three years ago. I was assigned to do a special on the environment, some issue involving pollution. When my boss and I talked as to what this thing was all about, what they were looking for, he said to me: 'You understand, you know, it's not going to come out the pro-environmental side.' And I said, 'It will come out however it comes out.' And he said, 'You can obviously give both sides, but just make sure that the pro-environmentalists don't get the last word,' he said. Reina declined to do the story. "
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russ_watters said:
His predilection toward paranoid conspiracy theory. I'm not a psrink, but from what I understand, that is not an uncommon result of emotional trauma: he isn't thinking rationally.
Are you denying this:

six months before the Soviet invasion in Afghanistan, starting in the Carter administration and continuing and escalating while Bush's father was head of the CIA, we recruited a hundred thousand radical mujahadeens to combat a democratic government in Afghanistan, the Turaki government.

russ_watters said:
and this: He won't even acknowledge that al Qaeda, based in Afghanistan, was responsible for his father's death. That implies to me a severe disconnect from reality.

What he says is that it was alqueda, not the afghan people who did the attacks. is more.. bin laden is from saudi arabia. and he get it's money from his family, stablished in saudi arabia.
 
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Some examples of how the media distort the reality in this case BBC but the technics are the same for all the media, this ones from bbcwatch.
http://www.bbcwatch.com/
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OMISSION OF CULPABILITY

The US and UK military were responsible for many civilian deaths and injuries in Iraq. However, we find that the BBC operates a subtle omission of culpability when reporting on these civilian casualties.

Gulf war…
“…he’s had both his arms blown off…his whole family were killed…his mother was pregnant and they were killed by a bomb…” [Today, 09/04/03]

Israel…
“…he lies in a coma with a bullet in his brain after being shot at by Israeli troops…” [BBC1, 6pm, 14/04/03]

Gulf War…
“…Nine civilians killed in Baghdad blast…” [Online, 08/04/03]

Israel…
“…Six killed in Israeli raids…” [Online, 04/04/03]

Gulf War…
“…At least nine civilians are reported to have died when a bomb hit a residential neighbourhood in central Baghdad…” [Online, 08/04/03]

Israel…
“…At least five Palestinians have been killed in an Israeli air raid on Gaza City…” [Online, 09/04/03]

Gulf war…
“…warplanes…pounded Saddam Hussein’s hometown…” [R4, 6pm, 11/04/03]

Israel…
Israeli warplanes appeared to be targeting a car,” [Online, 09/04/03]

Gulf War…
“…bombing raids by F-15 and F-16 jets…” [Online, 08/04/03]

Israel…
“…an Israeli F-16 warplane fired two missiles…” [4] [10/04/03]

Gulf war…
“…there's a new sound in the city - rotor blades from attack helicopters…” [Online, 08/04/03]

Israel…
“…Israeli attack helicopters fired missiles into the town…” [Online, 11/04/03]

Gulf War…
“…two journalists were killed by a tank shell, a third died in a strike on Al-Jazeera’s headquarters…” [R4, 6pm, 08/04/03]
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THE PALESTINE HOTEL
On the 7th April 2003 an American tank fired at the Palestine Hotel – a Baghdad hotel where Western journalists were staying. A number of journalists were killed in this incident. We often find that the BBC correspondents work hard to mitigate this coalition action which killed a number of innocent people. Again, it is a case study in military empathy and mitigation, and it raises the question over whether such efforts are made to understand and humanise the actions of the Israeli army.

“…as I was saying, this is a microcosm for what has been happening and the kind of security challenges faced by the coalition forces in the centre of Baghdad…” [Ten Special, 07/04/03]

“…and cameras can be mistaken for rocket-propelled grenades…in this kind of situation it’s difficult for a tank commander or any kind of infantry vehicle to distinguish between a camera and an RPG…” [Ten Special, 07/04/03]

“…can you give any indication as to whether there could be any confusion within the building in terms of who’s in the Palestine hotel, as to who’s a journalist, who’s a member of the press and who might be representing other interests within that building?…” [Ten Special, 07/04/03]

“…clearly there is a possibility I suppose that somebody could be operating, could be sniping from the top floor of the hotel…” [Ten Special, 07/04/03]

“…Could it be that journalists who are watching the action could be mistaken for snipers, particularly if they’re using binoculars?…” [Ten Special, 07/04/03]

“…it is entirely possible, I mean we are formally not supposed to film from the hotel, we’re only supposed to film from our live positions on the first floor roof…”[6] [Ten Special, 07/04/03]

The above incident contrasts sharply with the BBC’s treatment of a similar incident involving the death of an HBO cameraman on April 3rd 2003 – just a few days prior to the Palestine Hotel incident.

“…an award-winning British journalist has been shot dead by Israeli soldiers as he filmed a documentary in a refugee area in Gaza… cameraman James Miller suffered fatal injuries after an Israeli armoured vehicle opened fire, wounding him in the neck, according to reports…
…Mr Miller had been filming…in Palestinian areas while working on a documentary for the American HBO network…” [Online, 03/04/03]

DISPLACEMENT OF BLAME

The most frequent technique employed in the mitigation of coalition culpability is the displacement of responsibility onto the Iraqis themselves. There is a suggestion that were it not for Iraqi tactics, their trickery, and their persistence in not letting the coalition kill them, risks to civilians would never occur. The Iraqis initiate violence; they invite reciprocation; they “draw” the military into using their biggest weapons. US and UK actions are always seen as a response to an Iraqi action. A pattern of cause and effect is established in which coalition actions are always seen as a response. Coalition forces are cast as trying to play a gentle role and being pulled reluctantly into confrontations.


“…the main reason for these [friendly fire] incidents is the fact that air power is being used in an environment where Iraqi targets are mobile and operating close to mobile coalition forces…” [ Online, 07/04/03]

“…But British troops have been drawn into urban fighting…” [ BBC Online, 04/04/03]

“…but clearly it is really difficult fighting terrain because the British have been drawn into urban warfare…” [BBC Online, 04/04/03]

“…The Iraqis are taking shelter in-between civilian houses and using those houses as places to fire from. This means civilians could be in the line of fire that comes back from the coalition forces…” [BBC Online, 04/04/03]

“…So no matter how well intended the British troops might be, the civilians are trapped in the fighting and they are under severe pressure….” [BBC Online, 04/04/03]

“…This is Noah…he’s twelve and he’s fighting for his life in hospital since a bomb targeting Iraqi fighters hiding in his neighborhood hit his house…”[11] [BBC1, 6pm, 09/04/03]

DEHUMANISATION OF IRAQIS

There are certain moments when the BBC incorporates the language of the coalition military into their narratives. This is frequently military jargon that dehumanises the Iraqi enemy, making it more palatable and less disagreeable for extreme measures to be taken against them
The BBC plays a role in harnessing the public’s support for the death and destruction taking place. They legitimise coalition actions and dehumanise the Iraqi army. They talk of “mopping up”, of “tidying up” of “business” being “tied up.” The human life behind these expressions is glossed over by abstractions.


“…business has according to the British military commanders been tied up[23] now…” [Newsnight, 07/04/03]

“…There may still…be pockets of resistance. Complete celebration may be premature, there may be quite a lot of resistance to mop up…” [09/04/03]

“…These mopping up operations could take days or weeks longer…” [Newsnight, 10/04/03]

“…in parts of the city now there’s a little bit of mopping up going on. But nothing significant…[24]” [BBC1, 6pm, 14/04/03]

“…is it your sense that the war is effectively over and it is just a matter now of tidying up?..” [Today, 08/04/03]
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etc etc etc
 
  • #38
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Oh Jesus, this thread was flawed from the very start.

'The' Money.
 
  • #39
jammieg
Burnsys, I think you give the media and politicians too much credit for doing something intelligent, let me give you my anecdote, my younger sister was charged with a misdemeanour drug charge for a joint found in her car ash tray and she just happened to be sent to court on the same day of another minor drug bust in a small town and reporters just happened to show up that day to court to get the big scoup, in which all the drug dealers just happened to be scheduled on, oh and this town just happens to have an absurd number of police officers and churches on every corner, and guess who is on the front page of this small town paper played up as a big time drug offender? My sister, age 17, "Columbian Connection", basically the police need the press to "show how they've been fighting crime" which really means secure our laid back jobs, and the press needs this story to "get the word to the people" which really means exaggerate as much as possible to secure our jobs with the bestseller-fear, and the courts and the churches are all run by the same group of insane people who feel they need "protection from evil" which is really probably guilty feelings that are being manifested from all the people they screw and they use this to justify manipulating the taxpayers into having too much law enforcement, so it all comes down to everyone's an idiot with some very simple and selfish covert motives with very justfied looking overt ones, except for my little sister she was just trying to mind her own business and get high.
I'll bet if you apply this principle to our politicians and big time media you would find a lot of the same stupidity but on a grander scale, I think the real problem is people watch bias and love it and ultimately pay for it thus we control the media(unless it is a government program, or they provide the source information?), if they loved bland objectivity then we would have more dry and objective news reporting so either people are ignorant in general of bias or they also love bias to support their own views or such. This makes everything more exciting too and people pay high dollar for excitement. Although I don't doubt that our government is the most materially productive in the world because they manipulate their citizens the best in the world, that's probably mostly due to we see more commercials to buy stuff in order to "be happy" than anyone else in the world.
 
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2_versions_of_time.jpg
 
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  • #41
My research concurs with this: most of the media is owned by the 3 media conglomerates: Time Warner, Disney, and Viacom. This consolidation has been taking place over the last 70 years without much interference from the government, after all, what politician wants objective coverage of their own doings? It's better for the media to consolidate, it's easier to control the content this way without so many independent media.

But, politicians did not anticipate the internet and they are pissed. But, I predict the same type of consolidation of internet resources until only those voices that support the status quo will be allowed. For example, take a look at the Social Sciences section of Physics Forum, many politically incorrect ideas are being discussed that NEVER are in the mainstream media. The internet is relatively free speech at the moment, but after enough consolidation I predict pressure will come to not allow such speech or ISPs will shut down websites. Time Warner/AOL owns a major internet backbone and recently threatened the ISP who uses their backbone. This ISP was providing internet connection to Neo-Nazi advocate Don Black's server which hosts Stormfront.org, the world's largest Neo-Nazi forum, and Time Warner/AOL wanted the ISP to forbid Don Black from hosting several Nazi websites on his server. So, it's not an issue of how retarded Nazis are, it's an issue of free speech.
 
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  • #42
A quick note: CNN used to be an independent outlet and would provide a little more balanced coverage of the Middle East under Ted Turner, but it was then bought off by Time Warner/AOL. Fox News in the forth largest media conglomerate, I believe, and I am curious to know if the major giants (Viacom, Disney, Time Warner/AOL), will buy them off.

Most of the popular magazines and written media is also owned by these three groups.

Time Warner CEO: Gerald Levin
Disney CEO: Michael Eisner
Viacom CEO: Sumner Redstone (born Murray Rothstein)

What do these three people have in common? Well, they share an identical cultural, political, and ethnic background.

Fox News CEO, Rupert Murdoch, is politically identical to the above three with respect to foreign policy, but differs in some respect regarding domestic policy. There is some evidence though that Murdoch's Mother is of the same ethnic background as the above three, but it is hard to verify.

NBC Universal CEO: Edgar Bronfman, Jr. His father is Edgar Bronfman, Sr., president of the World Jewish Congress.

NBC News CEO: Neal Shapiro, similar background as above examples.

There are a few other big time players as well, like the New York Times, Newsweek, U.S. News & World Report, etc. All the CEOs have similar backgrounds as above.
 
  • #43
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Lobby, Political Contributions, and the revolving door

Source: http://www.openairwaves.org/telecom/report.aspx?aid=405
(Nice Charts)

Some FACTS:

WASHINGTON, October 28, 2004 — A new Center for Public Integrity investigation of campaign contributions, lobbying expenditures and other spending shows that the communications industry has spent $1.1 billion since 1998 to affect election outcomes and influence legislation before Congress and the White House.

The report focuses on the three primary communications industry sectors that control the information pipelines in the United States – broadcasting, cable television and telecommunications

A breakdown shows:

-Total lobbying expenditures from 1998 through mid-2004 by the industry were more than $957 million. In comparison, the oil and gas industry spent $396 million over the same period, the Center has found.

-Campaign contributions from 1998 through September 2004 were $145.6 million. The total includes both hard and soft money donations from industry employees, labor unions representing employees in the communications industry and political action committees.

-The Center identified 450 industry-funded trips valued at $704,229 from 2000 through March of 2004


In addition to studying political spending, researchers were able to identify 311 former top congressional aides and FCC officials who have left government service and gone to work in the communications industry

Of the three sectors, traditional telecommunications companies spend far more on contributions and lobbying than broadcasters or cable companies. A sector breakdown shows:

-Telephone companies like Verizon Communications Inc. and AT&T Corp. spent $498 million on lobbying, $60.5 million on campaign contributions and $276,000 on trips for an overall total of $559 million. (See information on telecommunications spending)

-Broadcasters spent $222.3 million on lobbying and $26.5 million on campaign contributions and $165,000 on trips for a total of $248.9 million. (See information on broadcast spending)

-Cable television providers spent $119.9 million lobbying, $20.5 million on contributions and $226,000 on trips for a total of $140.6 million. (See information on cable television spending)

Among the top spenders on lobbying:

General Electric Co., which owns 80 percent of NBC Universal in addition to a number of cable networks, topped the lobby spending list at $105.2 million. (The total includes all lobbying by the giant conglomerate, even though it draws only a portion of its revenue from broadcast operations. Federal disclosure rules do not require companies to separate lobbying expenditures by subject.)

Second by a small margin was Verizon Communications Inc., the nation's largest phone company. The former regional Bell operating company spent $102.5 million from 1998 through mid 2004. Verizon has key financial interests in local and long-distance phone regulation, spectrum allocation for its wireless division and a multitude of other issues.

Third on the list of top lobby spenders was AT&T Corp. at $75 million.

The partisan preference of the communications industry as a whole has leaned toward the Democratic Party. Total contributions were split 56.2 percent for Democratic candidates and party organizations and 43.2 percent for Republicans. That does not extend to the two current candidates for the White House: President Bush leads Sen. John Kerry by a wide margin, $1.8 million to $1.1 million.
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"We live in a dirty and dangerous world. There are some things the general public does not need to know and shouldn't. I believe democracy flourishes when the government can take legitimate steps to keep its secrets, and when the press can decide whether to print what it knows."
-- Katherine Graham, Washington Post publisher and Bilderberger
 
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Directors' Fees

Locrian said:
Aparently you are unfamiliar with the idea of a Board of Directors.

I don't mean to be rude, but your statements in the past few posts have suggested you are ignorant about the way corporations work. These questions you ask ("who appoint the CEO") are not deep philosophical issues, but (usually) straightforward matters that are well known to anyone with any understanding of US business.

Would you not agree that these kinds of failures to gather even the most basic knowledge about business practice would be an impediment to forming a reasonable opinion on the matter? I'd like to humbly suggest you give up all arguments in this thread, go expand your knowlege base dramatically, and then reform your opinions. Even if you come to the same conclusions you will have greatly improved the strength of your stance on these issues.

Are there too few media outlets? How compacent is the media? Who has too much power over what they say? Is collusion between the board and CEO's acceptable? Are the laws in place to prevent it enough?

These seem to me to be reasonable questions. However, neither you nor the person you initially quoted seem the least bit equipped to answer them.

I found this:

Source: http://eatthestate.org/03-20/DirectorsFees.htm [Broken]

Phillips lists the corporations that have ties to the boardrooms of the fourth estate and they include many companies that stand to profit from U.S. policy in Iraq. The most obvious profiteers are the defense contractors, two of whom own TV networks: General Electric (NBC) and Westinghouse (CBS). Among CBS's directors is Frank C. Carlucci III, who happens to have been a deputy director of the CIA under President Carter and was Secretary of Defense from 1987-89, when Saddam Hussein was a valued U.S. asset. (Now that's cashing in on the D.C. revolving door from government to industry!) Both companies share directors with other defense contractors: Allied Signal and Textron for NBC; General Dynamics for CBS.

GE doesn't just own NBC and sponsor news shows on PBS, it also provides a member of the board of directors at the Washington Post, as does Textron. The Post, by the way, owns Newsweek and the Everett Herald, and is the former employer of the Seattle P-I's editorial page editor.

No company got better PR out of the 1991 Gulf War than Raytheon, whose Patriot missiles looked far more effective on TV than they were in reality. Raytheon happens to have two directors on the board of Knight-Ridder, which owns the Philadelphia Inquirer, Miami Herald, San Jose Mercury-News, and 49.5 percent of the stock in the Seattle Times.

In last month's bombing, the Navy unloaded several hundred "obsolete" cruise missiles on Iraq at $1 million a pop, coincidentally making room for orders for new ones. The missiles were made in Kent by Boeing, which provides a member of the board at Times Mirror, owner of the Los Angeles Times, Long Island Newsday, and the Baltimore Sun.

The New York Times has a director who also sits on the board at Texaco. At Times Mirror you can find a director from Amoco. Ashland is represented at the Washington Post. Phillips Petroleum has a director at Knight-Ridder. Meanwhile Gannett, the nation's largest newspaper chain and owner of USA Today, has a director from du Pont, which technically isn't an oil company, but you'd be hard pressed to find many of their products that aren't made from petroleum.

The same holds true on the broadcast side. Mobil and Chevron representatives sit on the board at Time Warner, which owns CNN and Time Magazine. CBS has directors from Ashland and Sunoco. Exxon has someone on the board at NBC, as does Goodyear, whose tires are made of synthetic rubber which is made from oil.

The banking industry also benefits from the U.S.'s Iraq policy, as it has from every American military action. The investment banks underwrite U.S. debt to pay for the bombing, which has the added benefit of letting other nations know that they may be next if they try to stand up to western capital. That may come in handy as debt is destroying economies from Indonesia to Venezuela (and, hey, there's oil in those places, too).

The banks and Wall Street firms are well-positioned to have their voices heard in America's newsrooms. J.P. Morgan & Co. has people on the boards of Knight-Ridder, the Washington Post and NBC. That's the same J.P. Morgan that played a major role in getting the United States into World War I because it was Britain's biggest creditor and its loans would have been worthless if Germany had won. Bet you didn't learn that in your high school history class.

Bank of America provides a director for Gannett and Walt Disney, which owns ABC. Chase Manhattan has directors at CBS and NBC. Citicorp has directors at Time Warner and NBC. Banc One is represented at CBS. Lehman Brothers has a director at the New York Times. Salomon and Wells Fargo have directors at the Washington Post. Bankers Trust New York has a director at Fox, and American Express directors can be found at Gannett, the Washington Post, and Time Warner.


Interlocking Directorates
http://www.fair.org/media-woes/interlocking-directorates.html [Broken]
---------------------------------------------------
“The Matrix is everywhere. It is all around us. Even now, in this very room. You can see it when you look out your window or when you turn on your television. You can feel it when you go to work, when you go to church, when you pay your taxes. It is the world that has been pulled over your eyes to blind you from the truth.”
Morpheus, in the movie ‘The Matrix’
 
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  • #45
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It's cute that you found that, but you will need to be more clear as to its significance.

You seem to have completely given up on the argument you started this thread with.Before you fill up another post, would you like to state your new one? The tactic you are using is a common one: when you can't back up your initial argument, tack on unrelated ideas and hope your opponent attacks them - at which point you can show he is wrong and claim victory.

I'm not so gullible.
 
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Locrian said:
It's cute that you found that, but you will need to be more clear as to its significance.

You seem to have completely given up on the argument you started this thread with.Before you fill up another post, would you like to state your new one? The tactic you are using is a common one: when you can't back up your initial argument, tack on unrelated ideas and hope your opponent attacks them - at which point you can show he is wrong and claim victory.

I'm not so gullible.


My first post of this thread:
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It's been said that only a handful of people own all the money in the world. Many refuse to believe this, but in reality, there are only about six people/corporations that own the ten big media.

If given much consideration, one can discern that the power of the news rests with these head-haunchos who determine what we should be told, how, by whom, and when, and certainly what slant or outright untruths and disinformation should be passed on to us. I find it amazing that educated people today still trust in the media for the truth, and how fallow we are about what really is happening

The Columbia Journalism Review does a commendable of job of trying to keep up with all the media ownership and merger changes. The lists of monopolies and cross-owernships run seemingly endlessly like the roll call of immigrants on Ellis Islands' walls. Therein lie two key problems: 1). domination, and 2). pre-determined information. The global media giants kick us in our pants every time we turn on a radio or TV channel, surf the Net, read a newspaper, magazine, or book by feeding us only what they want us to know, and not what is authentic. Thus, our opinions are built solely on their propaganda."
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i don't see when i given up the argument, the argument is the media is controled by a small group of people.
But the fact that i can't show who are the top shareholders of those 7 or 8 corporation does not invalidate my other arguments that the media is controled by a small group of peple to make more profit and gain more power...
And this is not about "Wining a thread" or losing. it's about showing a point...
 
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  • #47
russ_watters
Mentor
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Burnsys said:
i don't see when i given up the argument, the argument is the media is controled by a small group of people.
The argument is the implication: the level of control. You have failed to prove your claimed direct control over the content we see. You have backed off that and now just keep saying over and over how only a handful of companies run the media - as if that, in and of itself, means anything.

Going back to the first post and checking the source, I realize now I probably shouldn't have even responded: the source is a conspiracy theory website of the worst quality. Chemtrails? Pblackfft. :rolleyes:
 
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russ_watters said:
The argument is the implication: the level of control. You have failed to prove your claimed direct control over the content we see. You have backed off that and now just keep saying over and over how only a handful of companies run the media - as if that, in and of itself, means anything.

And what about the "Executive memo" delivered each morning in fox news??
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"An email sent to Jim Romenesko's for posting on the message board of the journalism training center, The Poynter Institute by former Fox News producer, Charlie Reina, explained how bias permeates the Fox newsroom. "The roots of Fox News Channel's day-to-day on-air bias are actual and direct. They come in the form of an executive memo distributed electronically each morning, addressing what stories will be covered and, often, suggesting how they should be covered. To the newsroom personnel responsible for the channel's daytime programming, The Memo is the bible. If, on any given day, you notice that the Fox anchors seem to be trying to drive a particular point home, you can bet The Memo is behind it," he wrote. "
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Or how bbc distort the new to make them look like they want????
 
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  • #49
russ_watters
Mentor
21,024
7,728
Burnsys said:
And what about the "Executive memo" delivered each morning in fox news??
I thought we already covered that? Every news service has an executive producer who decides what goes on that day's news: every newspaper has one who decides what stories to research and print: every magazine has one.... That's how the media works. Heck, I start each week with an organizational meeting and post a job list/task list for the week! There is nothing conspiracy theory-ish about that.

And btw, the fact that there is such distributed responsibility for the content is evidence against central control.
Or how bbc distort the new to make them look like they want????
The BBC has a pro-Britain bias. Soooooooooo??? :surprised That implies nothing about anything.
 
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russ_watters said:
I thought we already covered that? Every news service has an executive producer who decides what goes on that days news: every newspaper has one who decides what stories to research and print: every magazine has one.... That's how the media works. Heck, I start each week with an organizational meeting and post a job list/task list for the week! There is nothing conspiracy theory-ish about that. The BBC has a pro-Britain bias. Soooooooooo??? :surprised That implies nothing about anything.

You have a little problem with the "conspiracy theory" word...

you are impliyng that bbc has a "Pro-Britain" bias.. that is my point, that the media has bias. all the media, and that "Bias" cames from the top, not from the journalists.. and in the top there is not much people....

Interlocking Directorates
http://www.fair.org/media-woes/interlocking-directorates.html [Broken]
 
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