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The wave equation at infinity

  • Thread starter Niles
  • Start date
  • #1
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Homework Statement


Hi all.

The wave equation at plus/minus infinity is zero:

[tex]\left. {\left| {\psi (x,t)} \right| } \right|_{ - \infty }^\infty= 0[/tex]

Does this also mean that:

[tex]
\left. {\left| {\psi (x,t)} \right|^2} \right|_{ - \infty }^\infty=0
[/tex]
?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
16
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no.

An interpretation of the square of the wavefunction is the probability of finding it somewhere; i.e.[tex]\int^{a}_{b}|\Psi(x,t)|^{2}dx[/tex] is the probability of finding the partical between a and b. you're looking at the probability of finding the partical inbetween +/-[tex]\infty[/tex]. I.e. anywhere.
 
  • #3
1,868
0
I'm not talking about the integral, but only the square of the norm of it. So I am only looking at the probability of finding the particle at exactly + and - infinity.

Will this equal zero?
 
  • #4
16
0
oh, yeah. 0 squared is zero.
 

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