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The World's Greatest Foods

  1. Aug 28, 2005 #1

    Ivan Seeking

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    As opposed to the recipe thread, it would be interesting to know what the greatest dishes are from all over the world. I think great food is one of the greatest pleasures in life.

    For example, what is great Irish food [Integral]? I have no idea what the Irish like to eat. And what would be considered a great Korean, Tasmanian, or Guamanian dish [MK]?

    The greatest food that I've ever had was in a rather spendy Indonesian restaurant in Amsterdam. My cousin ordered so I have no idea what we ate, but to this day my mouth waters just thinking about it - all seven courses. :tongue2:

    One of my favorite foods is tripe. The best tacos that I ever had were found at a sleazy little taco stand in one of the worst areas of Los Angeles. They made the best tripe tacos!!! We don't see tripe on the menus in Oregon. :biggrin:
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2005
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  3. Aug 28, 2005 #2

    Chronos

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    Tripe is a major ingredient of vienna sausages. Scary stuff.
     
  4. Aug 28, 2005 #3
    I don't eat tripe, but the best Mexican food is never found in the better restaurants. It's at the corner burrito place or hole-in-the-wall. I've eaten at dozens of these all over San Diego, and having tasted authentic Mexican food can no longer tolerate Taco Bell or get exited about the strangely sterile, Americanized Mexican dishes I've tried in "proper" restaurants.
     
  5. Aug 28, 2005 #4

    Pengwuino

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    Man i had this shell-type italian food at this buffet at a casino at Lake Tahoe. I know buffet food is suppose to be pretty watered down and bland... but oh my god, this was the greatest thing I have ever eaten in my life. I had never eaten any food that tasted better then that thing. It was like hitting some sort of delicious jackpot.
     
  6. Aug 28, 2005 #5

    ZapperZ

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    I would say that the signature dish of Indonesian/Malaysian cuisine is satay. And their version is significantly superior than the one you get in Thai restaurants in the US.

    I tried to convince my buddies of this by actually having a party and served Malaysian satay. It took me 2 days to prepare everything, from marinating the beef and chicken, to making the peanut sauce, to making the "pressed rice" cubes, etc.

    They now no longer argue with me when I say the Thai restaurants satay aren't the same. :)

    Zz.
     
  7. Aug 28, 2005 #6

    iansmith

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    My roomate is irish and he eats a lot of potatoes and fish. I never kney a person could do so many different recipe with potatoes alone. He makes some kind of fishs pie.

    My uncle is married to an Indonesian. She cooks some of the best food. The best is the asparagus-crab meat soup. I also have recipes.


    If anybody ever go to montreal, you have to eat the bagels and the smoked meat.

    For smoked meat
    Schwartz's http://www.schwartzsdeli.com/index2.html - I used to live a minute away from there and it is always busy and people line up outside.
    Bens - http://www.montrealfood.com/restos/bens.html
    Lester's - http://www.lestersdeli.com/

    For bagels
    Fairmount Bagels - http://travel.yahoo.com/p-travelguide-2803673-fairmount_bagel_montreal-i
    St. Viateur Bagels - http://www.stviateurbagel.com
     
  8. Aug 28, 2005 #7

    honestrosewater

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    My favorite food is anything that my grandma used to make. Just simple, good, I guess you would call it Southern home cookin'. Even something as simple as bread - hers was just miles above the rest.

    Oranges aren't really a dish, but every time I eat one, I just can't get over how good they are. :approve:
     
  9. Aug 28, 2005 #8
    Native American Fry bread tacos, and pan fried corn!
     
  10. Aug 28, 2005 #9
    Wow - I just read this WSJ article about this Native American woman who's leading a quixotic campaign against fry bread because it leads to health problems. First I've heard about this food. Sounds tasty.

    I love food too - had some great meals the last few weeks. I had some fantastic Vietnamese the other day at Golden Deli in San Gabriel. About a couple dozen very fresh oysters on the half shell at Quality Seafood in Redondo Beach. And superb sushi at Sushi Nozawa. I recommend the movie Tampopo for anyone who really enjoys food.

    LA is an amazing food city.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2005
  11. Aug 28, 2005 #10
    Indian food is great. Everything curry is great. Split peas and lentils, bombay potatoes, both with naan or roti bread, excellent stuff.

    Vegetable curry soup also goes well with it. Vegetable dumplings are also exceptional.
     
  12. Aug 28, 2005 #11

    Integral

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    There are many varieties of stew, I had some Stout and Beef stew at a pub, called the Porterhouse, that was excellent, the Stout is for the Pubs Stout beer, Within a few bites I began to understand Irish food. Just imagine what you would like to have on a dark, cold rainy January evening... Irish stew is the answer. Nearly every Pub serves a Lamb stew and/or a seafood stew. The stews seem to come with a lump of mashed potatoes in the middle. The side dish would,of course, be the main source of Dubliner vitamins...a pint of Guinness.

    It seems that the Irish are big on breakfast. If you order a Irish breakfast you will get, a bit of bacon, a pork sausage, Black and white pudding, Beans, grilled tomatoes, chips and a egg. I think the black and white pudding is an acquired taste. It resembles a slice of sausage, you get to slices about 3mm thick, and 3cm in diameter, one is very dark the other is very light, I am not sure what it is but, I was not all that thrilled by it. Is their anyone who can tell me more about this stuff?
     
  13. Aug 28, 2005 #12
    The white is a sausage pudding made with more garlic and herbs, the black pudding is ...BLOOD sausage...eeeiicck!
     
  14. Aug 28, 2005 #13
    Chicken Fried Steak with cream gravy, fried okra, mashed potatos, green beans, yeast rolls all washed down with sweet tea. Sweet tea MUST be made with pure cane sugar from Sugarland, TX. Since Dove season open in 3 days I must say that a dove breast wrapped around a hunk of cream cheese w/a jalapeno ALL wrapped with a slice of bacon and grilled over mesquite :tongue2: :tongue2: :tongue2: will make you slap your momma...not "yomomma" from this board. The downside is biting into a chunk of #6 or 7 lead shot used to bring them down, dodgy little blighters that they are. I'm heading to Luby's.
     
  15. Aug 28, 2005 #14
    The meal is known as "Scottish Mince" to me, but its just a variation on beef and potatoes basically :biggrin:

    While some relatives use corn (yuck) we use peas.

    Basically you take ground beef, cook it, mix in a light watery gravy (OXO? I'm no cook so don't ask me what it is), onion, peas and other fixins.

    You take mashed potatoes, spread a pile on a plate, then scoop the mince out of the frying pan and spread it over the potatoes.

    Keep it simple.
     
  16. Aug 28, 2005 #15

    Kerrie

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    PAN FRIED OYSTERS AND BEER BABY!!!

    I have had lots of pan fried oysters these past 8 months, but I sure do miss the beer....
     
  17. Aug 28, 2005 #16

    Ivan Seeking

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    Okay, I want Ian and Zapper to come over and cook!!!

    That soup sounds like something that Tsu would love! I'd like to take you up on a few of those recipes. :tongue2:
     
  18. Aug 28, 2005 #17

    iansmith

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    I think this thread will become a recipe thread. The recipe are translated and my aunt does not use much "standardized" techniques. It is all about experience and taste. I only gave two recipe because the other ones require special ingredients that I have obtained either the Indonesian store below the ambassy in Ottawa or at an Asian supermarket in montreal.

    ASPARAGUS KEPETING

    1 can of Asparagus
    1 can of crab meat
    ½ onion cut in in very small pieces
    3 garlic cloves cut in very small pieces
    Sesame oil
    2 tbsp of flour
    1 tsp of beef soup powder
    1 egg
    Corn Starch
    Salt

    Mix the onion and the garlic. In a wok, add a bit of oil and cook the onion garlic mix. Add the flour and then water. Bring to a boil, and add the asparagus (cut or not), the crab meat, salt, the beef soup powder, sesame oil. Bring back to a boil, then add the beaten egg, wait a bit and add a corn starch/water mixture untill the liquid becomes thicker. Heat and serve.

    MIE GORENG (Fried noodles)

    4 garlic cloves
    3 red onions
    Noodles
    Chicken (cut in small pieces)
    Chicken Broth Powder
    Salt
    Sugar
    Sesame oil
    Kecap raja raso (Regular Indonesian soy sauce)
    Kecap mamis (Sweet Indonesia soy sauce- it's a thick sauce, do not add too much)
    Egg

    Cook the noodles
    In wok, mix the oil with the garlic and the onion and cook. Add an egg, mix and then add the chicken. When the chicken is cooked add enough water to cover the chicken and the add the chicken broth powder, salt, sesame oil (not too much it give a sesame taste to dish), the kacap raja raso and the kecap manis. Bring to a boil, then add the noodles and mix untill the liquid disappear.
     
  19. Aug 28, 2005 #18

    Ivan Seeking

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    Awesome! Thanks. I was just telling Tsu about this...
     
  20. Aug 28, 2005 #19
    Hell yeah.
     
  21. Aug 28, 2005 #20
    Pierogi, Paczki, Nalesniki, Kluski and Golabki.....Polish food anyone?
     
  22. Aug 28, 2005 #21
    The best food i ever had is a crab that is almost 1 foot wide(from shanghai or somewhere).Damn friggin expensive too ( a few hundred Malaysian ringgit). Worth every cent tho.
     
  23. Aug 28, 2005 #22
    I'm sooo hungry, I WOULD slap yomomma for this meal right now, minus the okra. I say BRING ON THE DOVE!
     
  24. Aug 28, 2005 #23

    Moonbear

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    The pierogi my grandma makes are the best (and second best are the ones the other women at her church make for their Christmas party). That bland, icky stuff you get at the grocery store frozen section is nothing even close to what pierogi is supposed to taste like. And Kielbasa from a real Polish butcher is the BEST! If you've only had Hillshire Farms, you haven't had real Kielbasa!

    When I lived in Ann Arbor, once a year people would bring in Paczki for some holiday...I grew up with Polish grandparents and visited Poland, yet never heard of it before then. I was unimpressed when I learned they were nothing other than jelly donuts. I could get those every day from the local bakery in NJ (you could get them at Dunkin' Donuts too, but not as good as the ones at the bakery; Tim Horton's doesn't know how to make a good jelly donut :grumpy:).

    Other great foods...pizza in NYC!!!!! I really crave that and the first place I go whenever I'm in NYC is to the pizza parlor! Graeter's ice cream in Cincinnati (it is THE BEST ice cream I have ever had...even Haagen Dazs can't hold a spoon to it...and I'm going to miss it. :cry: They do ship it though, but it's expensive to do that...I might have to do it for special occasions to satisfy cravings :tongue2:). There's a comfort food that I like, which is possibly of Irish origin (my Irish step-family introduced me to it), and that's Poor-Man's Stew. It's fairly simple to make, brown some ground beef, add water, potatoes, and onions, some salt and pepper and boil for a long time. I think that's all that went into it. Very simple, and really good if you have a tummy ache. Oh, Welsh Pasties are good too. And my Chinese neighbor when I was a kid made the most wonderful food...spare ribs, some sort of asparagus dish, a chicken cooked with soy sauce, dumplings, wanton soup...yummy! Nothing like what you get in a Chinese take-out type restaurant (there were a few places near there that had more authentic dishes in a small section of the menu, or would make it if you knew to ask, but most stuff on those menus isn't the real thing). I used to babysit her kids, and they were the ones who taught me how to use chopsticks...it was kind of funny that I was a teenager learning from these little kids how to use chopsticks. :biggrin: I've also had some really tasty homemade Indian food. One of my friends from high school had this really tasty, and very spicy, snack at her 16th birthday party...I wish I knew what it was! It was addicting, though the spice really snuck up on you as you ate more. :approve: I've also been spoiled on homemade Italian food. I don't really like Italian restaurants much anymore since it's never as good as the homemade stuff. I've learned to make a lot of that myself too. Probably most of the food I cook for myself would be considered Italian moreso than anything else.

    And for the less cultural food, a place (long closed now) by where I grew up used to make deep-fried mushrooms (they made everything deep fried...it was the place to go if you wanted deep fried chicken too, and definitely a place to stay away from if you wanted to stay healthy). I LOVED those deep-fried mushrooms. Every once in a while, I get a craving for them, but cannot replicate the batter to get the right flavor to make my own.
     
  25. Aug 28, 2005 #24

    Moonbear

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    Oooh, yummy! I can help with getting that buckshot out of the birds. Last Christmas, we had some sort of small game bird (can't recall which one...maybe pheasant) that one of my sister's friends shot. They were already dressed, but I helped her with the final cleaning (whoever they had dress them did a cruddy job) and dug out all the last buckshot...nobody found any during the meal, though they were warned to be careful. :approve:

    How do you make your sweet tea? Do you use a special brand of tea, or just regular tea bags? And how many to how much water? And how long do you brew it? And how much sugar do you add? I've always wanted to know how to make proper sweet tea (unsweetened is NASTY, and that's all you can get in the north...you cannot add enough sugar to cold tea to make it sweet...otherwise it's just Lipton's iced tea mix).
     
  26. Aug 28, 2005 #25
    Sweet tea.

    to make one quart, boil water with
    1/2 cup of cane sugar{not beet sugar}, steep 4 tea bags{Red Rose is the best} for at least 10 minutes. remove the bags, let it cool to room temp ..pour over ice.

    And Paczki day is Fat Tuesday, right befor lent. Moon bear....did granny teach you how to make pierogi ?
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2005
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