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Thermal Modeling

  1. Aug 27, 2009 #1
    Hi all!

    I need to figure out a way I can predict the temperature range a small container of water (neglect properties small container and focussing on the water itself) will hold within an insulated expanded polystyrene (EPS) box of a given thickness, over a period of time. We can assume the ambient temperature is constant outside the EPS box. Surrounding the small container of water will be some frozen (~ -20ºC) water packs and some refrigerated (~ 5ºC) water packs that will all fit inside the EPS box. So a 2D cross section would show the layers in this order (outermost to innermost): EPS, Frozen water pack, refrigerated water pack, container of water. All the dimensions would initially be provided. I have some testing to do and this would REALLY save me some time. I haven't done any thermo in a long time so I'm sort of struggling with this one. I'm not looking for anything solved, just the necessary steps required and formulas associated.

    Thanks!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 27, 2009 #2
    if outside you have a ice pack+water mixtire, then the temperature of anything that is inside will be held at zero untill all the ice melts.
     
  4. Aug 27, 2009 #3
    Typically the temperature of the water inside starts around 6ºC, drops, then ends up a little over 8ºC. It never gets below 0. The water is surrounded by 5ºC gel packs, those have a few -20ºC ice packs around them and the everything is packed inside an EPS case. It never stays constant - I wish it would, it would make everything a lot easier. I'm asking for advice on how to calculate this because right now I do it with real time testing and I need to speed the process up. It doesn't have to be 100% accurate, just a relatively close estimate.
     
  5. Sep 1, 2009 #4
    No answers?
     
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