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Thermo Physics/Boyles Law

  1. Apr 4, 2009 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    How do I write equations on a computer?

    I need some help with some Physics equations. I am about to take a course. I have very poor math skills, so I am hoping to improve my confidence, while learning some interesting equations.

    I have included Boyles Law as it is the Boyle Law equation that helped me realise that I am missing something. I have studied Earth Science so far. I start chemistry/Physics next Trimester.

    2. Relevant equations

    My first question regards the equation: p = po + pgh

    p = Pressure
    o = angle (I think)
    h = height (I think)

    I don't know what the g stands for.

    I infer that the equation is saying: pressure = pressure x angle + pressure x g x height

    This makes no sense to me

    The other question regards the following pV = K1.

    This is known as Boyles law. It explains the behavior of gas.

    I understand Boyles Law, but not why it is expressed with that equation. If I were to read that equation without knowing anything about Boyles Law I would read it as the following:

    3. The attempt at a solution

    Assume p (pressure) = 5pa and V (volume) = 4m3.

    K1 = Constant

    5 x 4 = Constant (it actually equals 20?!)

    Which in my view makes no sense. I learnt at high school if two letters are beside each other with no symbol, than you multiply them. Perhaps i'm mistaken?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 5, 2009 #2

    rl.bhat

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    Homework Helper

    My first question regards the equation: p = po + pgh

    p = Pressure
    o = angle (I think)
    h = height (I think)

    po is initial pressure. g is acceleration due to gravity.

    pV = K1. for constant temperature pV is constant. K ar K1 does not make any difference.
     
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