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Thermoacoustic Refrigeration

  1. Aug 27, 2006 #1
    hi friends,
    I wanted to know about the Thermoacoustic Refrigeration.Can u plz submit any links or explanation about the topic.Looking forward to your replies.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 27, 2006 #2

    Danger

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    Sorry, bags, but I can't help you. I've never even heard of that before. I'm just weighing in so you don't think that you're being ignored. Others are looking for your answers. :smile:
     
  4. Aug 28, 2006 #3
    Here is an article with a decent basic description of the process.

    http://www.ehponline.org/docs/1994/102-9/innovations.html" Quote below from the article:

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017 at 12:25 PM
  5. Nov 24, 2006 #4

    LuZ

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017 at 2:13 PM
  6. Nov 25, 2006 #5

    FredGarvin

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    180 dB? Wholly molley. Forget worrying about fan noise from that fridge.
     
  7. Nov 26, 2006 #6

    LuZ

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    That's the internal sound pressure level. You'll find that the 'noise' amplitude inside a typical thermoacoustic refrigerator is in general, similar or less than that of a typical vapour compression system, so the expectation in external noise levels should be similar.

    A system I built myself that achieved an max internal SPL of 176dB operating at ~105Hz was found to emit a sound power level equivalent to 51dB(A) at 1 metre.
     
  8. Nov 27, 2006 #7

    FredGarvin

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    What's the main cause for the attenuation? From 180 to 51 dB is pretty substantial.
     
  9. Nov 27, 2006 #8

    LuZ

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    It is: believe it :smile:

    Provided that the structure is not driven at a resonant frequency, it's due to the high structural impedance to the operating frequency, and poor re-radiation of vibration at the external surface. Also, it's 176dB to 51dB(A): the 'A' weighting is also a factor here.
     
  10. Nov 27, 2006 #9

    FredGarvin

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    So is the acoustic source is a single frequency source? I guess that would make it easier to tailor the enclosure for those purposes. Pardon the pun, but very cool.
     
  11. Nov 27, 2006 #10

    LuZ

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    The interior is largely featureless so the operating mode is typically of very http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Q_factor" (low damping). There are of course harmonics associated with the operating frequency, but are usually of insignificant level.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017 at 2:17 PM
  12. May 14, 2007 #11
    Can anyone supply some details abount this type of cooling. Sounds interesting.
    Thanks
    Pat M
     
  13. May 14, 2007 #12

    LuZ

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    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017 at 5:35 PM
  14. Feb 16, 2010 #13
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017 at 8:59 PM
  15. Mar 20, 2011 #14
    Well, can anybody give me a comparative analysis of thermoacoustic compressors and conventional compressors regarding energy consumption and how much the thermoacoustic compress can compress gas/vapor i.e. upto which pressure level (in bars).
     
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