Thermochemistry: iron change

  • Thread starter mballaz
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So if a reaction involves Fe2+ and the same reaction involves Fe3+, which one would occur at a faster rate? I know that the nature of the reactants has to due something with this difference in the rate of the reaction but I'm not sure how to explain it. what about C2O42- (oxalate) and 2CO2. Which one would occur faster in a reaction in accordance to the nature of the reactants (how many bonds, and physical state)

Here's my attempt: could I say that a reaction with Fe2+ and O2 would have had less intramolecular bonds and therefore as a result of the nature of the reactants, a reaction including FeO would have occurred faster than a reactant of the molecule iron (III) oxide (Fe2O3. for oxalate and 2moles of carbon dioxide, i would just say that the oxalate has a change of 2- therefore it would form a compound whereas carbon dioxide is a stable compund with no charge. As a result, the use of 2CO2 would provide a faster rate of reaction in accordance to the nature of the substance.
 
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Borek
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I am not aware of any approach that will be general enough to allow make reasonable predictions about kinetics.

It doesn't mean such things doesn't exist - but my guess is that there can be many "small rules", applicable only to some narrow classes of reactions, but no general ones.
 
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