Thermodynamics questions

  • Thread starter cliff terd
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Main Question or Discussion Point

ok so I am trying to make a box that will absorb heat and hold it for a long time. (cheaply) But It has been a while since my last thermodynamics discussion and I keep confusing myself. specific heat I know is the value that of heat it takes to raise temperature. But does it also tell how well that material can hold heat? or is that thermal conductivity or something else all together.

or maybe I don't need to know the theory, maybe I can just ask. If I have a box I make out of steel, what is something cheep I can put n the box to help it hold heat. I am thinking sand but it has a low specific heat so I don't know if that is the right answer. Water will not work.
 

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  • #2
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Welcome to PF.

I am not totally sure of your arrangement and objectives, but yes the specific heat applies. In fact, the product of mass X specific heat is more significant.

Do an internet search for specific heat table.

Again, the "thermal capacity" of your box is:

mass X specific heat = density X volume-box X specific heat.

You might tabulate materials you can use, and find the one with the highest value of density X specific heat.

Just curious, how are you heating the box?
 

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