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Things to do during summer 2006

  1. Dec 28, 2005 #1
    I am planning my summer these days and can't really decide between these options:
    1.summer school, summer course, research experience
    2.have some fun and self study
    3.working

    Of course I would prefer the first one, but I wasn't very successful in finding a summer school, summer course or research experience that would be for undergraduates (I am freshman), and for non US citizens (I am from Austria).
    In general I am searching for something like the summer course in Stanfordhttp://summer.stanford.edu/programs/overview.asp
    (but this one is a bit expensive for me)
    or something like REU, but also for non US citizens.
    Any ideas?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 28, 2005 #2
    How about kicking back and having fun because finally that time of the year you've been waiting for has come? :D
     
  4. Dec 28, 2005 #3
    Well, in HS it might be ok to just goof off and have fun in the summertime when you don't have school, but once you move on to the college level you really should try and occupy some of your time with something else, like a job, or an REU, or classes. Also, eventually, you will be working year round (most likely) and you should begin to make the transition.
     
  5. Dec 28, 2005 #4

    Dr Transport

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    Go out and get a job. You'll get some cash for the school year and have time to have a little fun.....
     
  6. Dec 29, 2005 #5
    well anyway, what about the summer schools?
    do you know of any which I would be eligible for?
     
  7. Dec 29, 2005 #6
    Doesn't your university have summer classes? I was under the impression that most universities have summer classes for their students. I know that all of my teachers in high school take classes during the summer at various universities...
     
  8. Dec 29, 2005 #7
    well, he never said he was in college, and not all HS offer summer classes. When I first read his post I assumed he was in university, when he mentioned REU, since that is typically a college student activity. However, I suppose a HS student could get into one that is targeted at HS students.

    If you're still in HS and your school doesn't offer summer classes, maybe you could check out your local community college.
     
  9. Dec 29, 2005 #8

    JasonRox

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    Why not try to do some independent studying?

    This is probably one of the more difficult things for students to learn during university.

    Once you acquire this skill, you will be free to learn whatever you please.

    Note: You may not fully learn this skill in one summer. It's not as easy as opening a textbook, reading and doing some questions.
     
  10. Dec 30, 2005 #9
    I am in college - in the first year. My college however doesn't have summer classes.
    So I repeat the question:
    do you know of any summer program (like REU or SURF, or some summer school) which I would be eligible for?
     
  11. Dec 30, 2005 #10

    Dr Transport

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    REU programs usually accept students who have completed their 2nd year of college, if they are highly qualified. The students I have worked with in the past have completed 3 or 4 years of coursework.
     
  12. Dec 30, 2005 #11
    You do realize that there are REUs and SURFs that pay YOU to do research, and not the other way around, right? they pay quite well I might add. These opportunities might just be for more advanced students though (summer between sophomore and junior years).
     
  13. Dec 30, 2005 #12

    Pengwuino

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    I suggest you ask around to see if anyone has any work for lower-devision educated students (the professors). I would bet that most real REU's require at least some upper division work. I was checking out the Princeton Plasma Phsyics Lab summer program and they wanted people with intermediate e/m under their belt.
     
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