Thinnest possible latex wall?

  • #1
3
0

Summary:

Hello,
Im working on a project and I would like to inflate a latex tube to expand twice the original outer diameter or even more. The thinnest latex I have found is 1/8" inner diameter with 1/32" wall thickness. Does a 1/64" wall thickness exist or what other material can I go with?
I will be using a small pressure bulb with non return valve inside that is 1/8" OD which will inflate the tube.

Main Question or Discussion Point

1/8" ID X 1/64" wall latex tube?
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
chemisttree
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
3,251
203
How long does the tube need to be?
 
  • #3
3
0
Well if the product works for the intended purpose I would be ordering rolls of it. But for the specific purpose about 5 inches should suffice
 
  • #4
chemisttree
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Gold Member
3,251
203
  • #5
3
0
No too thin. I think i have to go with 1/32 W and just go with larger ID which will make it inflate. Its to act as an inflatable seal which allows for pressure adjustments. Thanks anyway!
 
  • #7
256bits
Gold Member
3,000
1,028
Perhaps the specifications for ID and wall thickness that you found are an industry standard for medical work.
Such as this specification (1973 but would that change over the years ).
http://everyspec.com/MIL-SPECS/MIL-SPECS-MIL-T/MIL-T-36966A_9346/
Poke on the orange Download File button for a PDF.

You could ask a manufacturer for a special order, or,

Try to make your own specific tube with your own latex.
http://www.rutherford-robotics.com/balloon/
For a mold you need something like plaster of paris ( kind of thin for plaster of paris perhaps ) that will absorb the water and congeal latex onto the mold.
Longer dipping time means thicker.
And some talc dusting to the latex doesn't stick to itself after removing from the mold.
Now to find the right type of latex.
Just a thought.
 
  • #8
Baluncore
Science Advisor
2019 Award
7,313
2,391
I expect there will be a problem with even inflation of the tube over the full length. Part of the tube will expand first and form a sphere, with two tails. That is because the pressure reduces as the tube radius increases, while the tube shortens.
It would be necessary to inflate the tube inside an outer sleeve that will prevent over-inflation. To make a single tube you would need to give it a two layer wall structure that will constrain expansion at twice the diameter.

Silicon rubber tube is available in the size you require. Is there a reason why it cannot be used?

Maybe you could use a flat tube that becomes round when inflated.
 
Last edited:

Related Threads for: Thinnest possible latex wall?

Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
6
Views
5K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
12K
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
2
Views
994
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
2K
Top