This Egg Drop Thing.Need Ideas

In summary, the conversation discusses the requirements for a science project involving creating an egg protector that can withstand a 5m drop. The group is struggling with coming up with a parachute design that meets the criteria and is not as simplistic as a giant garbage bag attached to helium balloons. One member shares a successful design from their middle school days involving duct taping an egg to a cardboard box lid, which was featured in the local newspaper. Other groups have come up with more complex designs, but the simple design proves to be effective and durable.
  • #1
Audience
For a science project we have to make an ''egg protector''. It has to have:

-parachute and
-base to hold egg in

(I just joined 30 minutes ago and could not find a forum like this. So sorry if this is a duplicate.)

Aaaaaanyways, our group has to drop it from a 5m tall height, the egg cannot break.
To make matters worse, I've gotten an ESL and the dumbest boy in my class in my group . . . who ruined the project TWO times. Oh, and you cannot believe what some of the other groups made. (A giantic garbage bag attached to 3 HELIUM BALLOONS . . . -_-)
I've came up with this awesome base with absorbs the pressure and also streches, but I'm scratching my head with the parachute. I want to make one with actual physics, and NOT a giantic garbage bag attached to 3 helium balloons. Help!
I'm basically on my own on this. The PARACHUTE IS KILLING ME! Any ideas?

Thanks,
Audience

P.S. Please don't say giantic garbage bag. Or helium balloons.
 
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  • #2
I still hold the record for best "Egg Drop" in my middle school. My design was featured twice in the local newspaper. Once when I used it to win, and again, several years later, when my younger brother repeated my victory.

Use two pieces of duct tape to secure an egg to a cardboard box lid. One requirement is that the sides of the lid must be taller than the egg (just in case it lands upside down). Just the lid! Discard the actual box. This design turns the entire transport mechanism into a parachute.

http://ep.yimg.com/ca/I/pokeorder_2140_221715908

Other folks had complex parachutes, suspension mechanisms, one kid put his in Jell-o, and a hundred other ideas.

I duct-taped an egg to a box lid. Took 5 seconds. Survived not only the initial drop, but also the endurance test (dropped until broken). Never broke. Also, our test was from the fourth story window of our middle school onto the parking lot. You can throw it like a Frisbee, drop it upside down, sideways, or whatever. I had to replace one corner of duct-tape ONCE. No padding, nothing.
 
  • #3
Nice Idea.
 
  • #5


Hello! It sounds like you have a challenging project ahead of you. Don't worry, there are many different ways you can approach creating an egg protector with a parachute and base.

First, let's start with the parachute. A parachute works by creating air resistance, which slows down the fall of an object. You can create a parachute using lightweight materials such as paper, plastic, or fabric. Make sure to test different materials to see which one creates the most air resistance. You can also experiment with the shape and size of the parachute to see how it affects the fall of the egg.

Next, let's talk about the base. You mentioned that you have already come up with a base that absorbs pressure and stretches. That's great! You can use materials such as foam, bubble wrap, or even a rubber band to create a cushion for the egg. Make sure to test the base by dropping it from different heights to see how well it protects the egg.

Another important factor to consider is the weight of your egg protector. The heavier it is, the faster it will fall and the more force it will experience upon impact. Try to keep your egg protector as light as possible while still providing enough protection for the egg.

Finally, don't be discouraged by what other groups have created. Everyone has their own ideas and approaches, and it's important to focus on your own project and make it the best it can be. Keep experimenting and testing different designs until you find one that works well for your egg protector.

Good luck with your project and don't hesitate to reach out for more help or ideas!
 

1. How do I design my egg drop contraption?

Designing an egg drop contraption involves understanding the physics behind the egg drop and brainstorming different ideas. Some key factors to consider include cushioning the egg, reducing the impact of the fall, and ensuring the contraption is stable. You can also research different designs online for inspiration.

2. What materials should I use for my egg drop contraption?

The materials you use for your egg drop contraption will depend on your design. Some common materials include cardboard, bubble wrap, cotton balls, and straws. It's important to choose materials that are lightweight yet sturdy enough to protect the egg during the fall.

3. How high should I drop my egg?

The height at which you drop your egg can vary depending on the rules of your egg drop challenge. However, it's generally recommended to start with a small height and gradually increase it until your contraption breaks or successfully protects the egg. This will help you determine the ideal height for your specific design.

4. How can I test my egg drop contraption?

There are a few ways to test your egg drop contraption before the actual challenge. You can drop it from a lower height first to see if it can withstand the impact. You can also try dropping it from different angles or on different surfaces to simulate different scenarios. Additionally, you can also use a raw egg or a similar object to test the effectiveness of your contraption.

5. How can I improve my egg drop contraption?

If your egg drop contraption fails, don't be discouraged! It's important to analyze what went wrong and make improvements. You can try using different materials, adjusting your design, or adding more layers of cushioning. Additionally, seeking feedback from others and researching successful egg drop designs can also help you improve your own contraption.

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