This may sound rather silly

  • Thread starter bomba923
  • Start date
732
0
Nomeclature of 'abnormal glucose isomer

Now this isomer may not really exist (it might...not sure),
but what is 1,2,3,4,5,6-hydroxycyclohexane more properly called?

*(that's how I named it--an isomer with molecular formula [tex] C_6 H_{12} O_6 [/tex]---with a cyclohexane base, just replace one hydrogen at each carbon with a hydroxyl group. But...I'm pretty sure there is a better, shorter, more knowledgeable name for it :frown: )
 
Last edited:
1,100
0
bomba923 said:
Now this isomer may not really exist (it might...not sure),
but what is 1,2,3,4,5,6-hydroxycyclohexane more properly called?
Well, the full name would be cyclohex-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexaol because you put the hydroxy branch numbers in the centre (remember?) but I think, due to the hexa in the middle, that you could say it is cyclohex-hexaol but this might not be true.
 

Gokul43201

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
6,987
14
The common name is meso-inositol (or simply inositol) and it belongs to a class known as cyclitols.
 

movies

Science Advisor
283
1
Wouldn't the "meso" part depend on the stereochemistry of the hydroxy groups?
 

Gokul43201

Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
Gold Member
6,987
14
Yes it would. I imagined the compound was the meso-compound as this isomer is very important in the pharmaceutical industry. It could as easily have been one of the chiral isomers, I guess.
 
732
0
Gokul43201 said:
Yes it would. I imagined the compound was the meso-compound as this isomer is very important in the pharmaceutical industry. It could as easily have been one of the chiral isomers, I guess.
Wow--I had no idea :bugeye:
I just thought this was any random glucose isomer :redface:

I was searching online--and it appears to a beneficial biological compound;

[PLAIN said:
http://www.independentliving.co.uk/vitamin4.html][/PLAIN] [Broken]
Experimental deficiencies have been caused in animals: they led to hair loss, rashes, constipation, a reduction in growth rate and increase in congenital eye defects. There is no evidence linking human deficiency to such effects.

Although little is known about inositol's role in the body, it seems to be involved in various functions, including construction of cell membranes and lipoproteins in the plasma. It seems also to prevent fat accumulating in the liver and other organs, and is important for metabolising glucose.
*Also, what is the proper name for this compound, "hexahydroxycyclohexene," "cyclohex-1,2,3,4,5,6-enol"---basically a cyclohexene, with one hydroxyl group on each carbon? (what is the correct name?)
*And what is the proper name for this compound, "dodecahydroxycyclohexane"---basically a cyclohexane, with EverY hydrogen replaced with a hydroxyl group? (12 hydroxyl groups, two per carbon) (what is the correct/proper name?) and, would this compound be very Very unstable?

---or, can any direct me to a webpage on the nomenclature of cyclitols?
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Related Threads for: This may sound rather silly

  • Posted
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Posted
Replies
3
Views
3K
  • Posted
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
7
Views
3K
Replies
3
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
5K

Physics Forums Values

We Value Quality
• Topics based on mainstream science
• Proper English grammar and spelling
We Value Civility
• Positive and compassionate attitudes
• Patience while debating
We Value Productivity
• Disciplined to remain on-topic
• Recognition of own weaknesses
• Solo and co-op problem solving

Hot Threads

Top