• Support PF! Buy your school textbooks, materials and every day products Here!

This question is only meant for the professionals

  • Thread starter tarekkkkk
  • Start date
27
0
Modern physics special relativity

1. Homework Statement
Two spaceships,A and B move toward each other on a head-on collision course,According to an observer at rest,both spaceships have a velocity of 0.6c along the x-axis.At the time of observation(t=0),spaceship A has the same x value (x=0) as the observer,and spaceship B is at a distance of 100 km away from him.

At what time will the collision occur for the observer at rest and for an observer on spaceship A?

2. Homework Equations
my thought ok dont laugh.... T=(2L/c)/((1-v/c)/(1+v/c))^(1/2) for the spaceship A
and T=(2L/c)/(1-v^2/c^2)^(!/2) for the observer at rest and L= 50 km when the collision happen thanks in advance
 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

27
0
well thanks no one can solve it what can i say this question is meant for the professionals lol
 
263
70
Use the formula for relative velocities (within Special Relativity)
 
Doc Al
Mentor
44,828
1,084
I don't quite understand how you arrived at those answers. Rather than just give your final conclusion, explain your thinking step by step.
 
Doc Al
Mentor
44,828
1,084
well thanks no one can solve it what can i say this question is meant for the professionals lol
You're the one who has to solve it, not me! (I can solve it just fine. :wink:)
 
27
0
relative velocities what do you mean by that theres F ,T ,Energies ,... but V i cant find it i have this book concepts of modern physics 6 th edition i cant find it thanks in advance please help!!!!
 
27
0
ok never mind my answer is wrong or right if yes i will explain it dont worry my doctor will ask me the same thing uve asked and if yes i will reply how i thought about it if no let me think again about the question...
 
Doc Al
Mentor
44,828
1,084
Here's a hint: Distance = speed * time. From the observer at rest's point of view, what the distance that each ship must travel and what's the speed of each ship? From ship A's point of view, how far away is ship B and how fast is it coming at him? (That's the relative speed.)
 
27
0
From the observer at rest's point of view, what the distance that each ship must travel and what's the speed of each ship?
50 km,0.6c
From ship A's point of view, how far away is ship B and how fast is it coming at him?
100km,0.6c
ok but whats the formula i have to use it d=vt no thers another one what it is thanks in advance
 
Doc Al
Mentor
44,828
1,084
From the observer at rest's point of view, what the distance that each ship must travel and what's the speed of each ship?
50 km,0.6c
That's correct. That's all you need to solve for the time.
From ship A's point of view, how far away is ship B and how fast is it coming at him?
100km,0.6c
Incorrect: For the distance, consider length contraction; for the speed, consider the relativistic addition of velocity to find the relative speed.
 
27
0
Thank youuuuuu ok L=L0(1-v^2/c^2)^(1/2) for lenght contration ok for the velocity i will try my best to find out how it will change any other hint it will be great (for the speed) thank youuuuuuuuu
 
27
0
i have to use relativistic momentum ?
 
27
0
0.6c +0.6c but >c what can i do ?
 
27
0
i have to use this formula vx=(0.6+0.6)/(1+0.6^2) ?
 
27
0
ok vx=0 !!!!{*_*}!!!!!!
 
Doc Al
Mentor
44,828
1,084
i have to use this formula vx=(0.6+0.6)/(1+0.6^2) ?
That's the one.
 
27
0
yoooooooooopiiiiiiii thank you then the answer for observer at rest T=50km/0.6c
and for the observer at A is T= (l=50km((1-0.6^2)^1/2))/0=infinty if yes im going to give a big thanksssssss
 
27
0
loooooooollllllllll i thought vx=0 think again
 
27
0
my mistake the answer is ? for observer at rest T=50km/0.6c
and for the observer at A is T= (l=50km((1-0.6^2)^1/2))/(vx=(0.6+0.6)/(1+0.6^2)) if yes im going to give a big thanksssssss
 
27
0
just tell me if yes or no because its 10:00 pm over here and tomorow i have to give it to my doctor no offense but thank you just tell me yes and i will study more.....
 
27
0
lol i will take that for a silent yes thank youuuuuuuuuuu
 
Doc Al
Mentor
44,828
1,084
correction

for observer at rest T=50km/0.6c
Right.
and for the observer at A is T= (l=50km((1-0.6^2)^1/2))/(vx=(0.6+0.6)/(1+0.6^2))
I was going to say almost right, but I'm afraid we neglected a key factor of this problem. (Almost right because from A's viewpoint, B must cover the entire distance not half of it.) While the relative velocity is correct, and the idea of length contraction is also correct, what is not correct is the idea that A agrees with the rest observer that B is at position x=100 km when A passes x=0. According to A, by the time A passes x=0, B has already passed the point x=100km and thus is even closer.

The efficient way to solve for the time that the collision occurs according to A is to make use of the Lorentz transformation:
[tex]\Delta t' = \gamma(\Delta t - v\Delta x/c^2)[/tex]

(I realize that this is a bit subtle if you are just learning special relativity. But that's the way it is.)
 
27
0
ok deltaT=T of observer at rest
v=Vx(0.6+0.6)/(1+0.6^2))=0.88c
and for the gamma the v inside it =0.88c ?
deltaX= (l=50km((1-0.6^2)^1/2))/
thanks in advance
 
27
0
man what to do hm.m...
 

Related Threads for: This question is only meant for the professionals

Replies
10
Views
1K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
11K
Replies
2
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
6K
Replies
1
Views
3K
Replies
1
Views
862
Replies
1
Views
2K
Replies
1
Views
2K
Top