This question's going to sound really stupid

  • Thread starter Manchot
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  • #1
Manchot
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This question's going to sound really stupid, but here goes: what letter is this supposed to be? I just came across it in a book of mine, but for the life of me, I can't tell whether it's a scripted R, n, or even pi. If I had to guess, I'd say that it's an n, simply because it looks somewhat like a lowercase n. However, if it is a scripted lowercase letter, then why is it the size of the uppercase letters? It's really bothering me, because when I'm reading, I'm not sure what to call it.
 

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  • #2
zoobyshoe
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I can't tell.
 
  • #3
Evo
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If you could show it in context we might be able to tell what it is.
 
  • #4
Ivan Seeking
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It looks like a script pi to me...
 
  • #5
zoobyshoe
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Its sum fansy ritin', aint it?
 
  • #6
pattylou
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I vote pi.
 
  • #7
Manchot
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Ok, the mystery letter is in Terrell Hill's "An Introduction to Statistical Thermodynamics," and refers to the number of systems in an "ensemble" of systems. (That's another reason why I would lean towards n.)
 
  • #8
Pengwuino
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Thats the Penguin Constant.

Since penguins are lazy, it is simply "1", no units.
 
  • #9
Manchot
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You know, Pengwuino, our user names are very closely related. Look up the word "Manchot" in a French-English dictionary
 
  • #10
Pengwuino
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haha, the Manchot constant :D

Damn, google even has a translator... why don't we all just run our lives off google.
 
  • #11
Knavish
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Definitely an n.
 
  • #12
zoobyshoe
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It's a hieroglyph from the wreckage at Roswell.
 
  • #13
Manchot
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Are you basing that on its looks or on the context?
 
  • #14
zoobyshoe
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Manchot said:
Are you basing that on its looks or on the context?
No, that's the information that was just beamed into my head from the mothership.
 
  • #15
JamesU
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it's either an n or an r. if it's alphanumeric, of course
 
  • #16
Smurf
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looks like a pi to me.
 
  • #18
zoobyshoe
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I think I saw that symbol chiseled in a piece of granite in the New Hampshire woods by a 10th century group of Irish monks who crossed the Atlantic in a skin boat.
 
  • #19
Smurf
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zoobyshoe said:
I think I saw that symbol chiseled in a piece of granite in the New Hampshire woods by a 10th century group of Irish monks who crossed the Atlantic in a skin boat.
Ah.. we've discov... WAIT A MINUTE! There were no monks in new hampshire in the 10th century. You're making this UP!
 
  • #20
zoobyshoe
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Smurf said:
You're making this UP!
It's somewhat embellished, yes, but it is basically true: there were monks in Ireland at the time, and there was granite in new Hampshire.
 
  • #21
Manchot
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I think I've figured it out. It's the Fraktur N, which as it turns out, is implemented in TeX. See for yourself:

[tex]\mathfrak{N}[/tex]
 
  • #22
JamesU
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I KNEW IT! it wasn't [tex] \pi [/tex]
 
  • #23
zoobyshoe
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Manchot said:
I think I've figured it out. It's the Fraktur N, which as it turns out, is implemented in TeX. See for yourself:

[tex]\mathfrak{N}[/tex]
That looks very close, yes.
 
  • #24
honestrosewater
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Elementary, my dear Watson! :biggrin:
 

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