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Thomas Nast

  1. Oct 31, 2005 #1
    It is a controversial issue of whether or not Thomas Nast's cartoons lead to the collapse of the Tweed ring. Some view him as a rasist and that the Times and Samuel Tilden did more, but others feel that he was able to effectively shift the opinion of the general population. I would like to see if there are any of your opinions on this subject. Most likely you are not going to understand any of this unless you have read into New York's history in depth.
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 17, 2005 #2
    Hmmm. I thought that would be the case. Has anyone read books set in the gilded age of America? The most recently written book on particularly Tweed was a book by Keneth Akerman, titled 'Boss Tweed.' Has anyone read it?
  4. Nov 20, 2005 #3
    I am slightly and vaguely familiar with the period froma having read excerpts of Mark Twain's The Gilded Age. I have seen pictures of some of Nast's cartoons, also. None of this is enough to offer an opinion on the degree of Nast's influence in shaping public opinion.
  5. Nov 20, 2005 #4
    Yeah I have discovered that it is a pretty obscure topic. Though I would recommend reading Kenath Ackermans book. It just came out last year and provides a good description of the time period. Too bad all the current historians hate Thomas Nast:cry:. Except for two that I found. I am writing my thesis paper on him right now and I will post it when I am done. Hopefully it will shine some light on this area.
  6. Nov 26, 2005 #5
    I have just completed my thesis. I would appreciate it if you pardoned the incomplete parentheticals and bad grammer. All comments are welcomed (even the unwelcome ones).

    View attachment Thomas Nast Paper.doc
  7. Nov 28, 2005 #6
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2005
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