Thought experiment

  • #1
I had this really random idea at lunch today - would it be possible to pull an electron apart? I know that it's a fundemental (point) particle and that most likely nothing is going to happen here, but do you think anything exotic could happen, if one were to suspend an electron between three pairs of very powerful (orthogonally oriented) magnets? Might the electron emit high frequency radiation?

I'm sure someone will quickly point out an obvious flaw with this idea, such as the inability of magnetic fields to 'do work'.

Thanks
 

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  • #2
ZapperZ
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I had this really random idea at lunch today - would it be possible to pull an electron apart? I know that it's a fundemental (point) particle and that most likely nothing is going to happen here, but do you think anything exotic could happen, if one were to suspend an electron between three pairs of very powerful (orthogonally oriented) magnets? Might the electron emit high frequency radiation?

I'm sure someone will quickly point out an obvious flaw with this idea, such as the inability of magnetic fields to 'do work'.

Thanks
Ignoring the notion that one can "pull an electron apart", how does "electron emit high frequency radiation" has anything to do with "pulling an electron apart"? We already know that we can generate EM radiation with electrons. After all, that's what synchrotron centers all over the world is doing. Does this mean that we have pulled electrons apart? That has no logical connection at all.

Zz.
 
  • #3
As I said, it was just a random idea - totally baseless in every respect. I'm just curious as to what an electron 'does' when subjected to extremely intense magnetic fields.
 
  • #4
ZapperZ
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As I said, it was just a random idea - totally baseless in every respect. I'm just curious as to what an electron 'does' when subjected to extremely intense magnetic fields.
All charge particles, not just electrons, follow the Lorentz force equation.

Zz.
 

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