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Thrust (pitching and plunging)

  1. Mar 19, 2014 #1

    hmd

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    Hello,
    i am wondering a situation; how does the thrust occur in pitching and plunging motions?

    thank you for reply.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Mar 19, 2014 #2

    SteamKing

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    Your question is a little vague. Can you be more specific?
     
  4. Mar 19, 2014 #3

    hmd

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    Dear SteamKing,

    ımm, how i can explain.. my supervisor asked me this question: " how could you ensure 'thrust' in plunging and pitching motions?" ...i investigated but i cannot find proper answer..
     
  5. Mar 19, 2014 #4
    Are you asking "How can you ensure an airfoil will produce thrust when it is pitching and plunging?"
     
  6. Mar 19, 2014 #5

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    Welcome to the PF.

    Is this for research or a class at your university? I see that you have another thread asking about wind tunnel design. What year are you in school? What is your aeronautics training so far?
     
  7. Mar 19, 2014 #6

    hmd

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    Yes RandomGuy88 that is the true question ;), and so what is the answer, could you help me?
     
  8. Mar 19, 2014 #7

    berkeman

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    You need to answer my questions before RandomGuy88 can answer your questions.
     
  9. Mar 19, 2014 #8

    hmd

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    Dear Berkeman,
    I am a master degree student in mechanical engineering department, this is my term project.
     
  10. Mar 20, 2014 #9

    rcgldr

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    "Thrust" normally means the force produced by a propeller or jet engine accelerating the air. It wouldn't matter if the air craft is pitching or plunging.

    Some people answering this thread are guessing that you meant "lift" instead of "thrust". Even in this case, the pitch of an aircraft if moving in a straight line (either climbing upwards or descending downwards), won't have a direct effect on the "lift" produced by the wings.

    Perhaps you are using the terms "pitching" and "plunging" to refer to the angle of attack of the wing?
     
  11. Mar 20, 2014 #10

    boneh3ad

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    That is typically what pitching and plunging means in the context of an airfoil. Essentially, the wing is flapping, like a bird's wing or a fish's tail. I think most people above understand that is what the OP is talking about, but not exactly what he wants to know about it. It is also unclear if we ought to be helping him with a school project without any hint that he has actually done any work on the topic already.
     
  12. Mar 20, 2014 #11

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    According to the PF Rules (see Site Info at the top of the page), undergraduate schoolwork problems/projects need to be posted in the Homework Help forums, and students need to show their work toward the solution.

    For graduate school problems and projects, they may be posted in the general PF technical forums (like here in the Aero forum), but only if the student shows *lots* of their work toward the solution. We do not do your schoolwork projects for you here, but we certainly can help if you show lots of your own research and work.

    Please post your work so far, so that this thread can go forward.
     
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