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Tilt Angle of a Floor Lamp

  1. Jan 21, 2010 #1
    I am trying to determine at what angle a floor lamp would begin to fall over(tilt over). The lamp has a rectangular base and is a little top heavy. Once i determine its CG, how can i apply force diagrams and mathmatics to determine at what angle it would begin to tilt?
    I could increase the rectangular footprint.
    I could lower its CG by adding weight to the footprint.
    There are many variables in geometry to consider. To simplify the project, how would you determine at what angle a 2"X4"x6' long board would begin to tilt?
    Thanks Much
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 21, 2010 #2

    tiny-tim

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    Welcome to PF!

    Hi maggardmd! Welcome to PF! :wink:
    Easy-peasy :biggrin:

    if you know where the CG is, then (technically by taking moments about any point on the edge of the base) it won't tilt so long as the CG remains above the base (or above its "convex completion" if it's partially concave). :smile:
     
  4. Jan 22, 2010 #3
    Thanks for the reply Tiny,
    I am new to this forum. Is there a way to attach a file to the message. I would like to attach a force diagram or sketch of the lamp to make sure i am not missing something.
     
  5. Jan 22, 2010 #4

    tiny-tim

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    Hi maggardmd! :smile:

    Yes, if you go to the Reply page (clicking the QUOTE or Advanced button will take you there), there's a "Manage Attachments" button in the "Additional Options" box.

    Dunno how it works though … I've never used it! :confused:
     
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