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Time and entropy

  1. Oct 18, 2007 #1
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    If time is a real quantity and has fundamental units (quanta), shouldn't distance (a real quantity) also have quanta? (I know there are some quantum theories that model quantised distance.)

    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution

    Time is imaginary and so is distance (neither have any "real" value but have imaginary value).
    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data



    2. Relevant equations



    3. The attempt at a solution
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 18, 2007 #2

    cristo

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    Well, firstly, this isn't a homework question is it? Where does your assumption come from that time is quantised?
     
  4. Oct 18, 2007 #3
    What's a tachyon?
     
  5. Oct 18, 2007 #4
    And no, this is a speculation I'm trying to deal with. Time must be an artefact of measurement, and this opens up the question whether distance can also be considered this way. Energy and mass are "real" things, but time (the "flow" of energy), and distance (an effect of mass separation), are artefacts of how we perceive the two, and have no existence, no external reality, like mass/energy do. Any ideas?
     
  6. Oct 18, 2007 #5

    cristo

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    A tachyon is a hypothetical particle that moves faster than the speed of light.

    That comment is enough to suggest to me that this discussion will not satisfy the forum guidelines: check out the "rules" button on the top toolbar.
     
  7. Oct 18, 2007 #6
    No worries...
     
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