Time Dilation of Fast-Moving Objects: Exploring Forces

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of relativistic electromagnetism and its effects on the forces experienced by protons in different frames of reference. The article referenced in the conversation describes how the electrostatic repulsion between two protons in the LHC is weaker in the lab frame due to time dilation, but is still present along with an attractive current. The conversation also discusses the possibility of a beam of fast-moving electrons creating a voltage and current, and the question of why electrons repel each other but can also create a current. The concept of colliding protons and an outside observer's perspective is also mentioned.
  • #1
godzenon
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I meant to say fast moving "objects" in the title, my bad... my title kind of sucks

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Relativistic_electromagnetism#The_field_of_a_moving_point_charge

That section is basically what my questions are about. I want to know generally about the overall forces. Two protons in the LHC moving the same direction will not experience much repulsion difference relative to their own perspective, but from our perspective outside the LHC their repulsion should weaken? The repulsion of two protons without electrons I mean.

But two protons colliding in the LHC going opposite directions. Because their speeds are not relative, they would have increased repulsion? I can't understand the wikipedia article that well. I think it's saying the increased repulsion would be from the sides as they pass each other (assuming they didn't collide)?

ok, one more question about, voltage and current, that i guess kind of has to do with time dilation. If you took a beam of fast moving electrons, could that create a voltage for a wire or something near by right? I mean of course a wire with current would create a voltage, but would it also work for a beam of electrons in a vacuum? How come electrons are supposed to repulse other electrons, but a voltage creates a current? thanks
 
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  • #2
Two protons in the LHC moving together feel an electrostatic repulsive force in their frames. When you transform this force to the Lab frame, it is weaker, because of time dilation.

In the Lab frame, these protons still have their electrostatic repulsion, but they also create a current, which is attractive, and substantially reduces the attraction. You get exactly the same force in this frame through this analysis as you did in the preceding paragraph.
 
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  • #3
Vanadium 50 said:
Two protons in the LHC moving together feel an electrostatic repulsive force in their frames. When you transform this force to the Lab frame, it is weaker, because of time dilation.

In the Lab frame, these protons still have their electrostatic repulsion, but they also create a current, which is attractive, and substantially reduces the attraction. You get exactly the same force in this frame through this analysis as you did in the preceding paragraph.
ok, what about colliding protons?
 
  • #4
What about them?
 
  • #5
Vanadium 50 said:
What about them?

by lab frame, you mean for an outside observer i assume

nothing should change relatively so i don't see why there would be an attraction force, when we don't see an attraction force at low speeds

the link i gave suggested that moving charges which are not relative have different forces acting upon them, just read my middle paragraph for the thread topic, or read anything past the first paragraph instead of asking me "what about them?"
 

Related to Time Dilation of Fast-Moving Objects: Exploring Forces

What is time dilation?

Time dilation is a phenomenon in which time appears to pass slower for an object that is moving at high speeds compared to an object that is at rest. This is a consequence of Einstein's theory of relativity.

How does time dilation occur for fast-moving objects?

When an object moves at high speeds, it experiences a change in its velocity and acceleration. This change in motion causes a change in the perception of time for the object, resulting in time dilation.

What are some examples of fast-moving objects experiencing time dilation?

One famous example of time dilation is the "Twin Paradox" in which one twin travels in a high-speed spacecraft while the other stays on Earth. The twin on the spacecraft would experience time at a slower rate and would age slower than the twin on Earth.

Another example is the use of atomic clocks on GPS satellites. These satellites travel at high speeds and experience time dilation, which must be taken into account for accurate GPS readings.

What forces are involved in the time dilation of fast-moving objects?

The main force involved in time dilation is the force of gravity. Objects with greater mass have a stronger gravitational force, causing them to experience more time dilation.

In addition, the force of acceleration also plays a role in time dilation. Objects that are accelerating, such as a spacecraft, experience time dilation due to their changing velocity.

Can time dilation be observed in everyday life?

Time dilation is only noticeable at extremely high speeds or in the presence of strong gravitational forces. In everyday life, the effects of time dilation are too small to be observed without highly precise instruments.

However, we can observe the effects of time dilation in cosmic events, such as the slowing of time near a black hole or in the decay of subatomic particles.

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