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Tips for sleeping

  1. Aug 10, 2005 #1

    JamesU

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    before the trip I took, I had a hard time getting to sleep. it lasted 5 days. now, I've been having the same problems for over a week! I'll see a doctor next week. anyway, anyone have some advice? I want something tjat may help me relax and get to sleep.
     
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  3. Aug 10, 2005 #2

    Moonbear

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    Something that's been working really well for me lately is...a lot of hard work and vigorous excercise during the day so I just am too exhausted to stay awake at night. :biggrin: Really, when I went to Quebec and spent all day walking around on very hilly streets, I slept so well at night and had no problems waking up early and staying alert all day.

    Something else that has been working is to focus my overactive thoughts when I'm trying to fall asleep. So instead of trying to fight the fact that my mind wants to wander all over the place and worry about stuff I can't do anything about, I just focus those thoughts to pleasant things. First I try to think about just making every part of my body relax, and then I just picture relaxing scenes, like sitting by a waterfall, and looking at rocks, then watching birds fly away in a big flock...I don't try to focus on one image or thought, but just keep letting my thoughts change and drift, but stick with a general scene, as if I'm just watching everything around me while sitting outside somewhere. It doesn't even have to be realistic, I can imagine a purple sunrise or sparkling birds, anything that's not work or to-do lists, or who I need to call, etc. It seems to work and I eventually just drift from those thoughts to dreaming.

    Of course, you could still just be readjusting to the time changes/jet lag from your trip. A week is about how long it should take to completely readjust.
     
  4. Aug 10, 2005 #3
    One trick that works for me, more so if I know I'm tired, but can't fall asleep.
    Pick only one SMALL thing in your room to look at, DO NOT look at anything else. Do not close your eyes. Just keep looking at it, and keep telling yourself not to close your eyes. Even if your eyes feel like closeing..keep looking at the small object.

    you'll soon dose off..I hope. Jet lag is horrid!
     
  5. Aug 10, 2005 #4
    The best thing to do is try to stay awake, you will get to sleep in no time.
     
  6. Aug 10, 2005 #5

    Moonbear

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    Pick up something like a textbook and try to force yourself to read a chapter a night. You'll be sound asleep in no time.
     
  7. Aug 10, 2005 #6

    Math Is Hard

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    I assume you've ruled out anything obvious like too many caffeinated soda pops?

    The trick that sometimes works for me is to systematically tense (for a few seconds) and then relax every muscle in my body. Start at the toes and work all the way to your eyebrows. Take your time with it. You will definitely feel more relaxed when you've completed the whole process.
     
  8. Aug 10, 2005 #7
    LOL, yes. We had one textbook in school we nicknamed the 'red book of death' (It's Krane's 'Introductory Nuclear Physics' if you really must know.) I never read more than 3 consecutive pages without falling asleep. Of course, that was back in school. The only excuse I ever needed to sleep was that I could.
     
  9. Aug 11, 2005 #8

    quasar987

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    Get your lazy a$$ out of your chair other then to scratch it. What I nonchalantly meant to say is do some exercice during the day. This'll tire you up. If you're not tired I suggest reading like an hour or so before closing the light. Never go directly from computer to bed, or from any highly brain-stimulating activity to bed unless your eyes are closing bt themselves.
     
  10. Aug 11, 2005 #9
    What I do is similar to what Moonie does. I grab hold of one of the random thoughts whirring through my head and turn it into a simple daydream. I try to make sure to not think about it much but hold onto the scene. I tend to be able to feel myself dozing and try to replicate that. Ofcourse at first when you try to replicate it you'll probably wind up waking yourself up as you realize that you are actually succeeding. That should go away though. I usually like having background noise. A regular sort of humm, usually I use a fan.
     
  11. Aug 11, 2005 #10
    Oddly enough I had an insomnia bout type thing that lasted a little over two weeks. I was getting 6 hours of sleep every 38-40 hours. Then when I moved to New Jersey, after a lan party, I could suddenly sleep again without a problem. Forcing myself to read 2 calculus chapters worked once, but then it became too interesting. I ended up digesting 5 fictional books in 5 days because of it.

    But all the sudden it ends. The problem with something like that is that it made me petrified to try to sleep, because i did not want to go through the strains of trying to sleep.
     
  12. Aug 11, 2005 #11
    Well, theres some website that offer some tips on how to get sleeps too.

    Try search "How to get Sleep" in google and u ought to find many of them.

    Cheers ~

    Sleep Well ~
     
  13. Aug 11, 2005 #12
    go to the corner store and buy some booze. :zzz: :zzz: :zzz:
     
  14. Aug 11, 2005 #13

    brewnog

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    If I didn't think that the sisterhood would shout at me, I'd agree with stoned!

    :smile:
     
  15. Aug 11, 2005 #14

    Moonbear

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    Aside from the fact that he's underage, that doesn't really work anyway. In the short term, alcohol is a stimulant, and it takes a while before the depressant properties kick in. Besides, it won't just help you fall asleep, but will shift your whole circadian rhythm (like caffeine will do), and then you end up not staying asleep and having more trouble the next night, etc.

    I actually can't sleep well at all if I've been out drinking. I might feel tired, but in a really restless sort of way (about the way I feel when I try to use caffeine to stay awake late and it doesn't really clear the mental cobwebs, just makes you really restless).
     
  16. Aug 11, 2005 #15

    loseyourname

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    On the other hand, opiate narcotics work quite well.
     
  17. Aug 11, 2005 #16
    There are a number of important methods and a few peron ones:

    1) Reduce/Stop Caffeine, Nicotine and other stimulents
    2) Go to bed and wake up at the same time every day.
    3) Do not eat a 'snack' before you go to bed.
    4) Minimise outstanding 'things to do'.

    others:
    5) De-clutter your bedroom. Make it your comfort zone.
    6) Light aroma theropy sometimes helps.
    7) A nice relaxing bath before you go to bed.
    8) Soft, relexing music that's barely audible can be effective.
    9) Temperature of the room is important.

    That's some at least :))
     
  18. Aug 11, 2005 #17

    Moonbear

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    I actually find a snack before bed helps. If I'm hungry, I have an even harder time falling asleep. A heavy meal isn't a good idea, but that's more from a weight-gain perspective, but a little snack can be just the thing (warmed milk is great).
     
  19. Aug 11, 2005 #18

    Moonbear

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    At least for a while, until you become addicted and you need to keep increasing the dose. :rolleyes:
     
  20. Aug 11, 2005 #19

    Galileo

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    I usually read some book in bed and I always fall asleep. Read something that needs lots of mental activity, that'll drowse you off to sleepyland in no-time.
     
  21. Aug 11, 2005 #20

    JamesU

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    contrary to what you're saying about NOT taking caffeene, the doctor said to drink tea half an hour before bed.

    what do you think?
     
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