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Job Skills To become a doctor

  1. Mar 7, 2016 #1
    The thing is I want to be informed about how challenging it is going to be to apply for an elite medical college in London or maybe in US.I think I can stand the challenge.I am still in my high school.I am supposed to take my SATs.What puts me in a depressed state is that I am quite weak in math though I am extraordinary in other sections.This will have a bad effect in my over all SAT score.I feel as if I am denied an opportunity to become a doctor just because I don't like math.
    Is there any other path that I can choose? I'm convinced that I shouldn't give up.Definitely not now.
     
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  3. Mar 7, 2016 #2

    berkeman

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    What motivates you to want to become a doctor? Have you had some experiences in the medical field already, or have you met some patients that made an impression on you? Are you certified in First Aid and CPR? Have you been able to do any volunteer work at your local hospital or other medical care facility? What country are you in? :smile:
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  4. Mar 7, 2016 #3

    Choppy

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    An alternative way of looking at things might be that you just need to work harder at math than you do in other subjects in order to get to where you want to go.
     
  5. Mar 7, 2016 #4
    Humanity.That's what motivates me.I am a certified first-aider.I am also a member of junior red cross society.Yes,I have witnessed a disaster in my locality.Floods that destroyed all of our homes.I have sponsored for the relief work.
    I have some experiences in medical field..I lost a beloved who passed away because of the inaccessible health care system.I wanted to make it more accessible.The death of the person created an impression in my mind.To not let any body else lose a person.My country,India,is the house of poors.You will see millions dying here everyday because of malnutrition and diseases whose cure was never found.At least the cures that aren't accessible to people.Doctors hate to work for poors here.And the poors become poorer each day.They eat the waste of rich,work for them and they die without even knowing what caused their death.I wanted to be a part of changing that.So I decided to become a doctor.So that I can die happily seeing the difference that I created.
    But still I have no idea how to reach there.My lack of interest in math has made my life worse.Can't help it.But I think where there is will there is always a way.
    And So I am searching for that way using forums like these. :-)
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  6. Mar 7, 2016 #5
    Mr choppy,I do know that,But for scoring high in any subject you need to have enough passion for it.I lack that.So it would be like cutting the tree with a blunt axe if I tried to improve my math.I don't think I can do something I hate for long.Of course,I can improve it if I work hard.But something more than that is required.If I wanted to apply for a well off college,I think I need a very high score in math too which I can't because for a very high score you need to love math.I can never do that in a million years.For me opening a math book is like entering a war unprepared.Moreover,I have chosen physics,chemistry,biology,computer science and economics as my subjects for high school.So I do not get to learn any higher level math.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2016
  7. Mar 7, 2016 #6
    No, you don't. I've known many who have done quite well with math, but didn't enjoy it. You don't have to love it, you just have to be mature enough to learn it because it's required. That goes for any subject.
     
  8. Mar 8, 2016 #7

    Drakkith

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    I don't quite agree. Scoring a high grade mostly requires that you put in the time and effort required to get that grade. This does not require passion in my opinion, but it does require persistence and many times the ability to make yourself do something which you don't really want to do.

    I understand. There are things that I hate doing too. Memorizing formulas is one of them. I don't have any real advice except perhaps that if you realize you hate it then maybe you can try to take steps to make it easier on yourself. I don't know how you might go about that, but it's something to explore.

    Well, most of those require you to use math. Do you dislike learning math, using math, or both? I find that I get immensely frustrated when learning math, but I don't mind using it at all.
     
  9. Mar 8, 2016 #8
    Well I have trouble with learning math,Mr Drakkith
    Let me see,Most of you tell me that I can still score high in math without loving it.I will think more about that.
    So none of you have any other suggestions about taking a different path?
     
  10. Mar 8, 2016 #9

    Drakkith

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    I don't think there's a path that's better than the one you're currently on. If you're serious about attending an elite school and becoming a doctor, then get used to a lot of hard work doing things you may or may not want to do.
     
  11. Mar 8, 2016 #10

    micromass

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    I think every single person has a subject (s)he doesn't enjoy but has to score well on. For some it is the English language. For others it is biology. For you it is math.
    I get it, it's not fun learning something you're not very interested in. But I'm sure you can do this since many others can do this as well without loving math.
     
  12. Mar 8, 2016 #11

    russ_watters

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    I can vouch for that. I like to say that engineers are physicists who hate math.
     
  13. Mar 8, 2016 #12

    russ_watters

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    Welcome to adulthood. That's the essence of what adulthood is!

    Think about it this way: as an adult, you are going to spend 2 hours a month for the next 70 years paying bills. That's 1600 hours. With college level math, you will spend about 800 hours and be done in 2 years. You'll live.
     
  14. Mar 8, 2016 #13

    mathwonk

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    i think a good grasp of the sciences is more important for medicine than math. you do have to routinely make elementary calculations to prescribe the right dosage of a medicine. but i think you don't use advanced topics like calculus or abstract algebra in daily practice. (although some programs may use calculus requirements as a method of eliminating candidates.) my wife is a physician and i speak from the experience of watching her prepare and practice. of course my wife was very strong also in math, but when she began to train for medicine i recall she studied rather things like organic chemistry and biology, not math. so it seems quite possible that you can master the small amount of math needed. But at some point you should try to get over your somewhat (to me) irrational attitude and make math a friend. It can help you. Everything has a price. For you the price of realizing your dream is to master a small amount of math. Is that price really too high?
     
  15. Mar 8, 2016 #14

    Drakkith

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    I agree, but I think the OP is more worried about how their math skills with affect the SAT and getting into a good school than how it would affect them as a doctor.
     
  16. Mar 8, 2016 #15

    berkeman

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    So from your posts, it sounds like you and your family have the means to send you to an elite college when it's time. If that's so, you should be able to find a very good math tutor now to help you get past your mental blocks about being good at math. I've helped several students to see things in their (basic) math studies that helped them to get much better and more comfortable at math. And BTW, when I was early in my (US) high school education, I was not very good at math. But I knew I wanted to study science in college, and was able to get much better in my math skills by the end of high school, and did fine on my SATs.
    One other alternate route to your MD would be to join the military out of high school, and select the specialty of combat medic. Spend a few years in the military gaining medical experience, and then go to school with financial assistance from your military tours. Complete your undergrad pre-med, and go to medical school, and build on your military medic experience. If you have an interest in emergency medicine, this is a very viable route, IMO. If I had it all to do over again, that is the route I would have taken. :smile:

    Whatever route you take, I wish you the best. It sounds like you have very good motivations for doing good for others in the world, and making it a better place. :biggrin:
     
  17. Mar 8, 2016 #16

    berkeman

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    Also, I'd like to give you a tip about medical school. I have a good friend who was an Electrical Engineer that I went to graduate school with, who after a few years working as an EE decided that he wanted to pursue his true calling and go to medical school and become a doctor.

    I was impressed first of all that he felt such a strong calling to the medical field, and had wanted to become a doctor for such a long time. He is a very intelligent person, and a strong EE, but I didn't know how he would do pursuing such a different field of study.

    We lost contact for a while when he was in medical school, but I met up with him a couple years after he graduated and was starting medical practice. He said something very interesting that I'd like to pass along to you. (Remember that I said he is a very intelligent person -- about like me if I say so myself...) He said that he had always been good at memorizing things, and it turns out that about half of the first couple of years of medical school involves memorization. Because he was so good at memorization, that gave him a significant advantage over the other students in his class, and let him focus on the harder parts of the studies.

    He finished near the top of his medical school class, and has gone on to become one of the premier specialists in his chosen medical field. Very impressive.

    So I'd just like to suggest to you that you work on your memorization skills and tricks early on, in addition to getting more comfortable with math. Memorization skills are far more important when you get to medical school than math will be. Even in my much more basic EMT skills and certifications, memorization techniques have been fundamental to being good at what I do in providing quality care under stressful conditions. :smile:

    Hope that helps some.
     
  18. Mar 8, 2016 #17

    Drakkith

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    Well, looks like I'll never be a doctor. An engineer's life for me! :rolleyes:
     
  19. Mar 8, 2016 #18

    berkeman

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    I figured out some memorization tricks for my EMT certifications that I can pass on to you if you want. Yeah, we memorize liek 10 constants and 10 equations in engineering, eh? :smile:
     
  20. Mar 8, 2016 #19

    Drakkith

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    Uh, yes... of course... *puts away his formula sheets*

    Sure. I can barely memorize my calculus 2 formulas. Probably why I got a sub-par grade last semester. Here's hoping my calc 2 test tomorrow goes okay...o_O
    Anyways, I think we've de-railed this thread enough for now. Feel free to send me a PM with those tricks.
     
  21. Mar 10, 2016 #20

    mathwonk

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    Drakkith. I meant to imply also that my wife studied mostly science, not math, before becoming a doctor, because that is what is tested on med school admissions tests, i.e. the MCAT. I think the SAT is pretty irrelevant to med school admissions. and there is hardly any math on the SAT either, just up through the first 1/2 of 10th grade I recall being told by my colleague who wrote and graded SAT's.
     
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