Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Today, in AP Biology

  1. Apr 1, 2009 #1
    We genetically modified E. Coli with jellyfish genes for flourescence. It was probably the coolest lab we've done yet. No freakin' titrations or counting and sexing any damn fruit flies.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 1, 2009 #2

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    That sounds awesome! We never did anything cool like that in high school.

    So, did it work? And can you make your intestine glow :wink: ?
     
  4. Apr 1, 2009 #3

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I wouldn't recommend putting the E. coli back where they came from. :uhh:

    That is a fun experiment to do, and very cool that you got to do it while still in high school. :approve: Sounds like you're having fun with that class.
     
  5. Apr 1, 2009 #4
    FOR ONCE!

    Lisa, haha. No. These E. Coli are special ones that won't survive outside of a lab environment. We actually haven't seen if they glow yet, but we can make our predictions based on what we did. Tomorrow we get to see if they glow.
     
  6. Apr 1, 2009 #5

    lisab

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Great...let us know how it turns out.
     
  7. Apr 1, 2009 #6
    Sure will.
     
  8. Apr 2, 2009 #7
    My girlfirend is using a similar thing on her year in industry. She is using the jellyfish gene to monitor gene expression of something to do with combatting cystic fibrosis. something to do with lipid based delivery. Her supervisor is investigating the use of genetically modified HIV (that sounds slighty risky to me but its a cool idea) as a delivery system for the corrected CF gene. I dont really understand it but it sounds interesting.
     
  9. Apr 2, 2009 #8
    We got our respected outcomes, big suprise. It was fairly interesting though.
     
  10. Apr 2, 2009 #9

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Great! As Chris points out, what you did in your biology class really is a tool used in actual research labs, not just some outdated busy-work exercise with no application beyond the classroom.
     
  11. Apr 2, 2009 #10
    Yeah. It was kind of scary as to how simple it was, considering that's the same method terrorists could use to create bio weapons.
     
  12. Apr 3, 2009 #11

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Rest assured, it's only easy because you were inserting a small gene that is known to work when transfected into the cells you were supplied with the kit used. Usually, you would transfect that GFP sequence attached to another gene of interest, and the reason for doing that is to find out if your gene of interest got into the cell and is being expressed by quickly looking for the GFP expression.
     
  13. Apr 3, 2009 #12
    I've done that exact lab!

    It was so cool...
     
  14. Apr 3, 2009 #13
    I remember that lab back in high school.

    It was cool but nowhere near as awesome as some of my chem labs in college.
     
  15. Apr 3, 2009 #14

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    My chem labs in college would have been a lot more fun if I wasn't always assigned a bench space next to a pyromaniac. :grumpy:
     
  16. Apr 3, 2009 #15
    Well mostly. Actually the to get glowing proteins the E. Coli we had had to A. have the positive gene splice for it, B. be resistant to ampicillin (sp?), and C. be in the presence or a certain chemical (ara-something).
     
  17. Apr 3, 2009 #16

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Very good. Do you understand why the cells became resistant to ampicillin when you successfully inserted a gene into them?
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Today, in AP Biology
  1. Today news (Replies: 3)

  2. The market today (Replies: 50)

  3. Biology quiz (Replies: 14)

  4. Today is special (Replies: 4)

Loading...