Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Tokamak Requirements

  1. Apr 23, 2009 #1
    What are the minimum standards for tokamak fusion? For instance, What are the ideal materials? Should you use deuterium, tritium, or a mixture of the two? How much current do you run through it before it confines the hydrogen gas enough to create fusion? Please answer.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 31, 2009 #2
    Nevermind the hydrogen types and the current problem, I found those out. Still would like to know which would be better for body construction - stainless steel or something else.
     
  4. Aug 2, 2009 #3
    weren't they trying to contain it with a magnetic field. are u wondering what to use to pass the current through , as for the construction im sure steel or stainless steel would be good as any .
     
  5. Aug 5, 2009 #4
    Are you sure steel will work? I don't want a http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pinch_(plasma_physics)" [Broken] going on - That'll set me back a bit.

    cragar: Yeah, I would like to know what kind of wire to pass it through to optimise magnetic pressure, i'm thinking of using copper.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  6. Aug 5, 2009 #5
  7. Aug 18, 2009 #6
    So- with a steel torus, copper wire, and deuterium gas, plus vacuum pumps, a high voltage power transformer and controls, I could theoretically make a device capable of creating fusion, right? The idea I had for this thread is that it would help me decide the materials I would need for making one at home. The guy in the address below made a stellarator, and I'm pretty sure I can build a tokamak for myself.

    http://es.geocities.com/queralv/Home1.htm" [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  8. Aug 18, 2009 #7

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    VB, what is your intention in this? Since break-even tokamaks don't exist yet, you are intending to build a model of a sub-break-even one? Like for a museum or exhibit or something?
     
  9. Aug 18, 2009 #8
    I am not trying to "break even" - I am trying to creat a tokamak that can achieve enough fusion through magnetic compression and ohmic heating to be detected by a http://www.bubbletech.ca/radiation_detectors_files/Bubble%20Detectors.html" [Broken]. In other words, I am hardly attempting a tokamak on the scales of ITER and the like. My main objective here is to prove that DIY tokamak fusion is possible.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  10. Aug 18, 2009 #9

    mheslep

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  11. Aug 19, 2009 #10

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    There was a running joke during the height of the Fleishmann-Pons "cold fusion" debacle that went something like this:

    "Did you hear the bad news about Fleishmann and Pons' assistants?"

    "Yeah, they're still alive!"

    As with the "do-it-yourself" accelerator thread, there is a significant safety element here that may be overlooked. The creation of neutrons in any experiment is one of the most dangerous thing you can produce, not just because it can directly hit you, but also due to the fact that it can induce residual radiation that lingers for a long time, long after you've switched off the instrument.

    I would seriously question anyone giving a DIY fusion device advice of any kind, especially when a person has never worked with any fusion devices previously and is ignorant of not only safety regulations surrounding such a device, but also how dangerous something like this can be.

    Zz.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 4, 2017
  12. Aug 19, 2009 #11

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Oh man, Zapper! You owe me a new keyboard. :rofl:
     
  13. Aug 19, 2009 #12

    mheslep

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    While recognizing there are regulations on any type of device producing ionizing radiation, these amateur D-D fusors that place in http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0921262.html" are hard put to produce more than ~50e3 neutrons/s, or ~6k mrem/s/sq_cm or 0.2 mrem/sec/sq_cm at 0.5 meters using 8 n/s/sq cm/mrem (ICRU - 1971) with 2.45 mev neutrons. I expect more attention need be paid to X-ray hazzards and high voltage handling in general with these devices.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 24, 2017
  14. Aug 24, 2009 #13
    I am planning to cover the high voltage wires with pvc piping and will have a little light that shows when the machine is on, so people will know to stay away from it. When not in use, it will be unplugged and the deuterium bottle will be taken off. When being handled, I will wear safety goggles, and rubber gloves to protect me. What other safety precautions do you recommend?

    -mheslep: I am not trying to go for the "easy" approach to fusion. I want to be able to prove that DIY tokamak fusion is possible
     
  15. Aug 25, 2009 #14

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    Don't you see a conflict with these two statements?
     
  16. Aug 25, 2009 #15

    berkeman

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    I think this discussion has gone on long enough. VB, you really need to get a clue about the dangers involved. Thread locked.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Tokamak Requirements
  1. Research on Tokamaks (Replies: 6)

  2. The problem of TOKAMAK (Replies: 10)

  3. Tokamak Question (Replies: 1)

Loading...