Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Topsy Turvy™ Upside-down Tomato Planter

  1. Apr 20, 2008 #1

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    http://topsyturvys.com/10001.html

    The TV commercial for these suggests that by inverting the plant, the flow of water and nutrients through the plants is enhanced, which sounded bogus to me, but all in all I wouldn't be surprised if these things work pretty well.

    How about it plant people; does this make sense?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Apr 20, 2008 #2

    DaveC426913

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Well, Time Magazine's 'Best Inventions' seems to think so.
     
  4. Apr 20, 2008 #3
    Many gardeners in the south west have planted upside down for years. It works very well. Note to all, you can use a hanging plastic flower pot{cheap} by cutting the drainage hole a little bit bigger, push the plant into it, then fill with dirt. My Mom use to cover the top with landscape fabric to reduse moisture loss in their very dry climate.
     
  5. Apr 21, 2008 #4

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The bit about water and nutrient transport isn't consistent with how plants really transport either, but the claims of avoiding fungus and rot from the ground seem reasonable (but any planter would accomplish that). I don't know if the plant would try to turn while growing though.
     
  6. Apr 21, 2008 #5
    I'd half to agree with Moonbear on that, I don't see how it would make a difference nutrient wise.
     
  7. Apr 21, 2008 #6

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    Oddly, I found the reviews for this particular model under a different model, I guess people that are making reviews can't tell which product they're reviewing. :rolleyes: The model where they posted the reviews actually have the plants coming out of the sides near the top, an improvement to the "topsy turvy". Anyway, this review is supposed to be for the "topsy turvy" model with the plant coming out of the bottom.

    http://www.amazon.com/Felknor-Ventures-81600-Tomato-Tree/dp/B000PX8VL2
     
  8. Apr 23, 2008 #7
    Would this concept work with other veggies? Like peppers?
     
  9. Apr 23, 2008 #8

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I wouldn't try this with peppers, Greg, even if it worked properly (which it doesn't). Peppers need to be grown in strong direct sunlight to ripen properly (at least here in Maine) and growing them in the shade of an upside down pot would be self defeating. Most vegetable plants seek sun to maximize their energy. Instead of letting my squash spread around on the ground and shade each other, last year I trained them to the south side of a 4' plastic mesh fence along their row. They put on tons of flowers and we ended up with at least 50% more squash than previously, with far less ground-contact softness and rot. They kept very will in our cold cellar, too, so we had buttercup squash whenever we wanted, right up until March, when they started getting a bit soft and I composted at least 1/2 dozen then.

    There are some innovative things you can do to improve crop yields, but apart from provided proper nutrients and good drainage, most of them (IMO) revolve around plant spacing, support, bracing, etc. The fence was an experiment that worked very well, so this year, the cucumbers are all getting the same treatment. I grew them in wire tomato cages last year, but they still vined along the ground a lot. I'll let them climb a fence instead and get maximum light.
     
  10. Apr 27, 2008 #9

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I guess that answers my question about the plants wanting to turn back upward.

    And, yes, I've had that problem with Amazon reviews before, too. People write reviews, but don't know what product they're viewing, so it's for some other model, and older version, etc.
     
  11. Apr 28, 2008 #10

    Evo

    User Avatar

    Staff: Mentor

    The Topsy Turvy tomato tower is being recalled due to it being unsafe. Seems the legs pop off and the thing falls over.
     
  12. May 7, 2008 #11
    World Gone Topsy Turvy?

    Has the world gone crazy? Has anyone ACTUALLY used this piece of garbage? I was stupid enough to try one this past week. The water in the container constantly dripped down the plant (Yes, water is subject to gravity! What a concept!) and kept both the stem and leaves constantly drenched in dirty, soil-containing water. And anyone who has ever grown tomatoes knows that the one thing you do not want to do is keep the leaves and stems of your plants constantly soaked in dirty water. The healthy little plant I placed in this ridiculous container lasted only about 3 days before dissolving into a little ball of dead, green goo. How the heck this company can get away with selling a product so patently bad and ill advised is beyond me. This worthless little emperor has not a STITCH of clothes! Please spread the word—if you buy this product you are doing nothing more than flushing your hard-earned money down the toilet.
     
  13. May 7, 2008 #12

    Ivan Seeking

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Thanks for your input funkmonk, and welcome to PF.
     
  14. May 7, 2008 #13

    Moonbear

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Ooh, do we get to mark the thread solved now that we have empirical evidence to debunk it? :biggrin: And yes, welcome to PF funkmonk.
     
  15. May 26, 2008 #14
    From what I remember, the way they talk on the commercial its like gravitropism doesnt exist. I havent seen the commercial in a little while, though.
     
  16. Oct 6, 2008 #15
    lol is it just me or does everyone else find this hilarious, growing plants upside down that is ^.^ i look at it the way that their roots are like our esophagus where in which if we are upside down it doesn't move any faster, er... slower for that matter.
     
  17. Apr 21, 2009 #16
    Re: World Gone Topsy Turvy?

    I live in Colorado Springs, CO. I currently have 3 tomato plants growing on shepard's hooks at the edge of my deck(they hang over to the outside). These plants are doing just fine, normal growth and developement as far as I can tell.(not extrodinarily better than my garden plants).

    1)plants grow based on gravity.
    If you point the stem down and the roots up, the stem will try to grow up and the roots will grow down. The the stem is not going to be a problem because the plant's weight will eventually pull it down. I'm not certain about the roots, they certainly can't grow through the plastic at the bottom of the tube but "exploding" upward in the bag is unlikely.

    IMPORTANT!!!!!
    2)This is basically a potted plant in a pot with very small drainage holes, BEWARE of over-watering because you do NOT want water to run all the way throught the bag and out the bottom. You will kill your plant because the water is going to keep the dirt at the bottom of the bag wetter if you over-water.

    3)While it appears my plants are doing well, because of item 2 I've found that there is actually MORE work to keeping the plants healthy. I can't just turn on the sprinkler and let the ground soak up excess water--I've got to keep track of when and how much I give each pot.

    As for lack of sun because of bag shade, I don't have that problem at all.

    I just hope the tomato crop justifies the extra work.
     
  18. Apr 23, 2009 #17

    dlgoff

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    The only good thing I can think of (have grown tomatoes for 40+ years) is that you can have them growing on your pourch where the deer don't go.
     
  19. May 15, 2009 #18
    I recieved the Topsy Turvy as a gift. I planted my tomato plant 5 days ago and the plant is already trying to grow back up. Basically my plant is in the shape of a "U". I'm going to take it out and plant the tomato plant in the ground.
     
  20. May 15, 2009 #19

    turbo

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    I lost tomatoes in last summers' drenching rains due to collar-rot. The fruit high up on the plants did OK, but the ones closer to the ground got splashed with muddy water in the showers, and the water pooled in the depression around the stems. I will mulch my tomato plants generously with straw this year to avoid such losses if we get another monsoon summer. Growing the plants in an upside down pot that would allow water containing mold and mildew spores to drip on the plant seems quite counter-productive.
     
  21. Jun 27, 2009 #20
    Interesting thread. I too was very skeptical about the topsy-turvy ads, particularly the BS regarding better water and nutrient transport – but intrigued by the concept since I have spent years on my knees searching for tomatoes that are 0.5-3 feet off the ground. I was too cheap though to purchase the “2 for the price of one official topsy-turvy planter” (and I read that they disintegrate quickly) so I cut holes in the bottom of 2 three gallon black plastic planters (in early June) and stuffed a tomato plant in each.

    The soil-filled water running out of the hole nearly killed one plant the first day – it recently sent out new shoots and seems to be recovering. Both tomatoes are happily growing up, as expected, and the excess water dripping out the bottom seems to be missing them now.

    After I planted the tomatoes, I read on a website that one should only use determinate tomatoes since they are “bush-like” and will not turn and grow up. I am skeptical of this claim, but if I try the upside-down experiment next year I will try a determinant variety. I do not know what kind I purchased, but I read a review that seemed to indicate the type of tomato would, in fact, make a difference in how successfully they grew upside down.
    http://howtogardenguide.com/2009/04/08/topsy-turvy-tomato-planter-review-an-update/

    I planted basil in the top of one pot and rosemary in the other, so if the tomatoes fail perhaps the pots will still produce a crop.

    It will be fascinating to see what will happen to the plants once (if) tomatoes start to form. If this thread is still active, I will repost later in the season with the results. I live in Denver, CO, so it will be interesting to compare results with the gardener in Colorado Springs who posted earlier.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Topsy Turvy™ Upside-down Tomato Planter
  1. Upside down recipe (Replies: 11)

  2. Oregon's purple tomato (Replies: 5)

Loading...