1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Torque Homework Help

  1. Nov 28, 2007 #1
    [SOLVED] Torque Homework Help

    1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data
    Here's the problem and I need to submit the answer online tonight!!

    Consider the rectangular block of mass m = 28kg, height h = 1.2 m, length l = 0.69 m. A force F is applied horizontally at the upper edge. The acceleration of gravity is 9.8 m/s2. What is the minimum force required to start to tip the block?


    2. Relevant equations
    torque = force x distance
    net torque = I*angular acceleration
    So the force diagram would be mg pointing down from the center of mass, which is just the center of the box, normal pointing up from the bottom of the box, and force F pointing right from the top edge.


    3. The attempt at a solution

    Normal force wouldn't provide a torque because right? So it has to do with gravitational torque right? Well, gravitational torque would be mg * 0.6 m (half the height) which equals 164.64 Nm. What do I do from there to find the force needed to tip the box??
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2007
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 28, 2007 #2

    PhanthomJay

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    No, gravity acts dowm, you want to compute its torque about the bot right corner of the box, which is the pivot point at the point of tipping where all the normal force acts. You are then correct that the normal force provides no torque at this 'tipping' point. But you have incorrectly calculated the gravity torque about that corner. Once you correct it, now you can solve for F by equating the 2 torques.
     
  4. Nov 28, 2007 #3
    So the gravity torque isn't 164.64? I thought torque is force times perpendicular distance to the pivot point. Also I still don't see how to solve the problem. What 2 torques do I equate?
     
  5. Nov 28, 2007 #4

    PhanthomJay

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Yes, you may have your measurements mixd up, the block stands on its short end and is 1.2m tall; the weight thru the cg of the box is at 0.69/2 m perpendicular to the corner, right? Now your Force F is applied at the top end of the box, so what is its perpendicular distance from its line of action to the bot right corner?
     
  6. Nov 28, 2007 #5
    So then torque gravity would be (28kg)*(9.81m/s2)*(.69/2m)? And Force F is .69 m from the bot right corner right?
     
  7. Nov 28, 2007 #6

    PhanthomJay

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    you've got he gravity torque OK, bu the problem says the horizontal force is applied at the upper edge, that is, at the top of the box. So what's the perpendicular distance to the bottom? Have you drawn a sketch?
     
  8. Nov 28, 2007 #7
    Actually Force F is 1.2 m from the corner, right?
     
  9. Nov 28, 2007 #8
    Ok I got the answer right now. Thanks!!
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Torque Homework Help
  1. Torque homework help (Replies: 2)

Loading...