Torque intersection problem

In summary: Assuming the pressure is acting along the x-axis, then the torque would be the same as before. However, you would need to do the calculation for each component separately to get the total torque.
  • #1
medo_andnino
5
0

Homework Statement


what is the torque if you know the the line of force intersects the center of the rotation ?


Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


I think the torque will be T= ( f*sin (45) )*d
But I'm not sure will there be a torque or not ...the intersection of virtual line of force with the center of rotation is confusing me !
 

Attachments

  • Untitled1.png
    Untitled1.png
    3.1 KB · Views: 394
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
About what point are you trying to find the torque?
 
  • #3
about the center of the rod
 
  • #4
medo_andnino said:
about the center of the rod
In that case, what would the distance be in your formula for torque?
 
  • #5
Torque is the ability of a force to rotate an object around a point.
T = F*r
The distance r is the perpendicular distance between the pivot point and the line of the force that works in on the point (virtual line).

So what is the perpendicular distance between the virtual line of force and the pivot point?
 
  • #6
What now ??
 

Attachments

  • Untitled.png
    Untitled.png
    3.9 KB · Views: 351
  • #7
medo_andnino said:
What now ??
Where is the force being applied? I assume that the point indicated, which is apart from the center. (1 m to the left and 1 m up from the center.)

The easy way is to just extend the line of the force and see that it intersects the axis of rotation. That should immediately tell you what the torque is, without the need for any calculation.

But if you want to calculate torques from each component separately, that's fine also. You'll get the same answer.
 
  • #8
One thing to realize when calculating the torque using F*r*sinθ, is that θ is the angle between the force vector ([itex]\vec{F}[/itex]) and the position vector ([itex]\vec{r}[/itex]).
 
  • #9
So you mean that the torque is going to be zero, right !
 
  • #10
right...
 
  • #11
T= ( f*sin (0) )*r
 
  • #12
okay ... one more question to be fully understood the topic ...assume that this left stick is under a pressure (the whole stick) ... Now How can I calculate the torque
 

Attachments

  • Untitled1.png
    Untitled1.png
    2.8 KB · Views: 406

What is a torque intersection problem?

A torque intersection problem refers to a situation in which two or more torques are acting on an object, resulting in a net torque of zero. This means that the object will remain in rotational equilibrium and will not experience any angular acceleration.

What factors affect torque intersection?

The factors that affect torque intersection include the magnitude and direction of the torques, as well as the distance from the point of rotation where the torques are applied. These factors determine the overall net torque acting on the object.

How do you solve a torque intersection problem?

To solve a torque intersection problem, you must first calculate the individual torques acting on the object and their respective directions. Then, use the principle of torque equilibrium (Στ = 0) to determine the overall net torque. Finally, use this information to find the value or direction of the unknown torque or object.

What is the principle of torque equilibrium?

The principle of torque equilibrium states that in order for an object to be in rotational equilibrium, the sum of all torques acting on the object must be equal to zero. This means that the clockwise and counterclockwise torques must balance each other out.

What are some real-life applications of torque intersection?

Some real-life applications of torque intersection include balance scales, teeter-totters, and door hinges. In these situations, multiple torques are acting on an object at different distances from the point of rotation, resulting in a net torque of zero and keeping the object in rotational equilibrium.

Similar threads

  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
488
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
30
Views
2K
Replies
6
Views
776
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
11
Views
226
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
30
Views
2K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
4
Views
671
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
22
Views
1K
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
1
Views
118
  • Introductory Physics Homework Help
Replies
5
Views
1K
Back
Top