Torque Philosophy: The Power of Change

In summary, torque is a measure of the "twisting force" applied. The amount of torque that a given force produces depends not only on the force itself, but on the leverage of that force. Your second rod has the force applied twice as far from the axis, giving it twice the leverage and thus producing twice the torque.
  • #1
paul-martin
27
0
http://img113.exs.cx/img113/5240/Torque.jpg
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
I assume your diagram is meant to show the same force being applied to two different rods. What's different is not the force, but the torque that the force provides about the given axis. Loosely speaking, torque is a measure of the "twisting force" applied. The amount of torque that a given force produces depends not only on the force itself, but on the leverage of that force. Your second rod has the force applied twice as far from the axis, giving it twice the leverage and thus producing twice the torque.
 
  • #3
Thx Al, but you didn't answer my question, you just gave a definition on what a torque is and who the distance from the rotation centre affect it's impact.

But my question was to understand why it is like that, why does the leverage affect how big the force is?

Thx for any answer given, kindly Paul-M
 
  • #4
Also i can't find this topic i check the General Physics but dosen't se it so i go by my profil.
 
  • #5
i have a 'guess' that might explain it: if you think of the massless rod as being the top of a right triangle (theres only one), then the longer the rod the longer the right part is. does that help? i mean you can reason that the force is cating away from the anchor point, and this anchor point has a harder time 'fighting back' if its farther away?
 
  • #6
Seen I aren’t English is it a bit hard to understand what you are saying; to start with, what you mean with “being the top of a right triangle” also with anchor point do you mean the point the rod is trying to rotate around?. A picture would make it much easier to understand what you are trying to say.

Kindly Paul-M A
 
  • #7
ill try with an ascii picture...

--------------
\ |
\ |
\ |
\ |
\ |
\ |
\ |

so the top horizontal bar is the one you apply the torque too. from the diagram, if you think about it purely non mathimatically, the vertical bar of this triangle will be bigger if the horizontal one is, and then because i remembered that there vectors, you see that the force is bigger. sorry about the ishy explanation

*edit* sorry, i can't make the formatting changes stay. but if you imagine shifting the little slashes so that they form nice straight lines, i think you can get the idea
 
Last edited:

Related to Torque Philosophy: The Power of Change

1. What is torque philosophy?

Torque philosophy is a concept that applies the principles of physics to personal and societal change. It suggests that small, consistent efforts can lead to significant and sustainable change over time.

2. How does torque philosophy differ from other philosophies?

Torque philosophy is unique in its use of the concept of torque, which describes the force that causes rotational motion. It emphasizes the importance of small, intentional actions, rather than grand gestures, in creating lasting change.

3. Can torque philosophy be applied to all areas of life?

Yes, torque philosophy can be applied to personal development, relationships, and even larger societal issues. It is a versatile concept that can be adapted to various situations and goals.

4. Are there any scientific studies that support torque philosophy?

While there is not yet a large body of research specifically on torque philosophy, the concept aligns with principles of behavior change and habit formation that have been extensively studied in psychology and neuroscience.

5. How can I apply torque philosophy to my own life?

To apply torque philosophy, start by identifying small, manageable actions that align with your goals. Consistently practice these actions over time, and observe how they lead to larger changes and improvements in your life.

Similar threads

  • Mechanics
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
13
Views
1K
Replies
7
Views
1K
Replies
21
Views
1K
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
30
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
2K
Back
Top