1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Torque Tension

  1. Oct 30, 2006 #1
    A 2-m long uniform rod AB is suspended horizontal by two vertical strings attached to the ends A and B. The rod has a mass of .6kg. A mass of 2kg suspended from the rod .8m from the end A. Determine the Tension in each string.

    Hi, I have a physics worksheet I am trying to work on. This has confused me, I'm unsure of what to put inside of the equation without any angles and two different strings. I have labeled A T1 and B T2 and I know T1>T2. Also Torque must = 0 for the system to be in equilibrium so I make an equation = to T0 but if anyone could help with what to put into the equation I need some help. Thanks so much!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 30, 2006 #2

    radou

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    What to put in the equation? Well, torques, for example. :smile: If you know the definition of a torque, there shouldn't be any problems.
     
  4. Oct 30, 2006 #3
    Right, but which masses? Is it something like Torque0 = T1(2.6)(.8) - T2(1)(.6)? Are they subtracted or added?
     
  5. Oct 30, 2006 #4

    radou

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    You can start by calculating setting the torque with respect to point A (or B) equal to zero. If the torque 'rotates' clockwise, choose a positive sign, and if it 'rotates' counter clockwise, choose a negative sign.
     
  6. Oct 30, 2006 #5
    Its not rotating either way, the whole beam is in equilibrium. The two strings are holding it up and I need their tensions.
     
  7. Oct 30, 2006 #6

    radou

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    I know it's not rotating, I didn't mean that literarely. I was talking about the direction of the torque.
     
  8. Oct 30, 2006 #7
    What are the tensions notwithstanding the 2 kg mass? What does the 2 kg mass add to the downward force of each end of the bar? How does this influence each tension?
     
  9. Oct 30, 2006 #8
    It would cause a downward counter clockwise motion that is positive. The tension is greater for the string on A than B w/ more weight. The weights need to be converted to newtons and multiplied by 9.81 for gravity.
     
  10. Oct 30, 2006 #9
    What is the effect of the added mass on each string?
     
  11. Oct 31, 2006 #10

    radou

    User Avatar
    Homework Helper

    As said before, use the equations of equilibrium. How is equilibrium expressed? What must vanish? You can use two torque equations (with respect to points A and B), and use the fact that the sum of the vertical forces must vanish as a check.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?



Similar Discussions: Torque Tension
  1. Tension & Torque (Replies: 1)

  2. Tension! (and torque?) (Replies: 7)

  3. Torques and Tensions (Replies: 2)

  4. Tension and Torque (Replies: 1)

  5. Tension and torque (Replies: 12)

Loading...