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Torrent file downloading.

  1. Feb 27, 2017 #1
    I am not familiar with torrents and do not usually use them. But now, I have to. I try to download a file from kickasstorrents. When I click on "download torrent" a window appears, prompting me to choose an application. Would somebody please explain how I will proceed at this stage?

    Thank you.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Feb 27, 2017 #2

    Borg

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  4. Feb 27, 2017 #3
  5. Feb 27, 2017 #4

    Borg

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    Yes, I wouldn't get involved with them. They are a well-known haven for malware. I have antivirus and firewalls also but I wouldn't go near one of those sites. It's like playing Russian Roulette with 3 rounds chambered.
     
  6. Feb 27, 2017 #5
    What do you think about using cracked programs from respect of security?

    Thank you.
     
  7. Feb 27, 2017 #6

    jedishrfu

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    A cracked program is an executable program and hence malware could have been inserted and will run when you execute the program.
     
  8. Feb 27, 2017 #7
    I have also avoided the torrents, but I did use it to download some Ubuntu or Xubuntu distributions, using the link from their site. I assume that is safe, but now I'm wondering. The torrent app was far superior to downloading through a browser. I have a medium speed connection (some would say low speed), ~ 6 Mbps tops. The app was very flexible, allowing me to pause, and set (and schedule I think) BW limits (that let me download in the background during the daytime, while not affecting our VOIP phone, or other internet use). Normally, a download like that really messes with other devices in use.

    So would you think that the torrents are OK for reliable sites?
     
  9. Feb 27, 2017 #8

    berkeman

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    What's a cracked program?
     
  10. Feb 27, 2017 #9

    jedishrfu

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  11. Feb 27, 2017 #10

    berkeman

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    Thanks. So that's a bad thing, right? Well, I guess it depends on one's perspective...
     
  12. Feb 27, 2017 #11
    There is nothing excessively dangerous to the torrent format, the danger comes mostly from what you're downloading; some professional companies actually distribute legitimate content via the Bittorrent protocol, but again so do many malware distributors — it's up to you to try and figure out what's safe and what's not, but that's another topic. To respond to your question, you are asked to select an application because the Bittorrent protocol requires a specific client: you must download and install it separately, once. I recommend either Vuze, Transmission or uTorrent (the latter is the most popular but has become quite add-ridden so I moved away from it)
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2017
  13. Feb 27, 2017 #12

    jedishrfu

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    Its bad from a legal perspective since you are leaving yourself open to theft of software lawsuits and from a more serious operational perspective since someone could have inserted malicious code into the program.
     
  14. Feb 27, 2017 #13

    jedishrfu

    Staff: Mentor

  15. Feb 27, 2017 #14
    Thanks - good point about the MD5 hash code, with the Linux distributions I downloaded, I always checked the MD5. No point in trying to install a broken system, and it does provide assurances safety-wise.
     
  16. Feb 27, 2017 #15

    QuantumQuest

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    While BitTorrent protocol and network is not illegal, the content shared is more often than not subject to copyright violation. That is the main reason that using torrents became so popular. Now, using a torrent client can put you in several potential risks: legal settlements, infection by some malware and problems with your ISP. The protocol itself is built in such a way, that every torrent client connecting to a torrent network, exposes the IP of your machine to all other devices connected and there's no way to bypass this. There is software running by copyright holders, so your IP can potentially be monitored regarding the first of the above mentioned potential risks. For the second, you can never be sure what may have been injected into the software you download: from some virus that can potentially be monitored by your antivirus software - this is many times under question, because malware creators create signatures not immediately identified by antivirus programs and when they do after some hours or days, your machine will already be infected, to some benign looking Trojan horse that will open a port sometime and download the real malware.
    For the third risk, you may get some penalty from your ISP because they really - and for good reason, don't like to have battles with copyright holders but also because they don't want the bandwidth they provide get overspent.

    Now, there is legal software that is distributed (or more precisely crowd sourced) by legitimate locations and this poses no problem in general but even then a good and up-to-date antimalware program is an absolute need.
     
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