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Town or countryside

  1. Jun 5, 2015 #1

    wolram

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    In general i think you townies must be less healthy, breathing in all that exhaust smoke and industrial fumes
    and suffering more stress from city travel and overcrowding,
    Whereas us country folk suffer far less, we have clean air and far less stress traveling along uncrowded country roads ,i'm sure if a survey was done it would be found we live longer than you townies.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 5, 2015 #2
    Smoke is another way dead yourself. İ think all smookers are stupid.
     
  4. Jun 5, 2015 #3
    This would be true except for other things in play in the UK. Mystery novels written in the UK demonstrate that all residents of the U.K. fall into one of three categories. They are either 1.) murder victims, 2.) murderers, or 3.) amateur or professional sleuths who solve the murders. So, 1 in 3 U.K. residents will die an unnatural death by murder, especially if they live in a quiet country village, another 1/3 will end up incarcerated for murder, which is not a healthy lifestyle, and only 1/3 will lead a whole natural life, (provided they solve enough murders).

    Of course mystery novels don't reflect reality. Reality presents a fourth option, which is to lead a whole natural life by writing mystery novels.
     
  5. Jun 5, 2015 #4

    Bandersnatch

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    I'm of the opinion that all the country bumpkins must be constantly warding off unwelcome advances of wild, hungry animals such as bears, polar or otherwise. Let's not even mention permanent hay fever from all that hay laying around, the wear and tear on their legs due having to walk places, hordes of bloodthirsty earthworms tangling at your feet, trying to prematurely pull you into the moldy embrace of well-tilled earth, the horrible hillbilly disease, cultural establishment deprivation, parasites in unfiltered water and rampaging malaria-carrying mosquitoes which are left to prey freely on the unsuspecting passers-by in the absence of trusty vermin-eradicating city smog.

    By Jove, I'm surprised there's even any life out there! You must be like those post-apocalyptic barbarians, entrenched in fortified outposts against the inexorable onslaught of elements and boredom. Do you, like, need any supplies?
     
  6. Jun 5, 2015 #5

    WWGD

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    AFAIK, most animals live significantly longer in captivity than they do
    in the wild, so much for the picture of "nurturing Mother Nature. I think
    this extends to humans. But there may be personalities that fit either
    type of environment better. I would personally like to alternate, though
    spending the majority of time in the city. But I am far from the income bracket
    where I can afford that.
     
  7. Jun 5, 2015 #6

    OCR

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    Yes, it's a constant struggle to even survive... but don't forget about the "view "... :oldbiggrin:

    DSCF0008.JPG

    DSCF0068.JPG

    DSCF0160.JPG

    DSCF0141.JPG

    DSCF0143.JPG
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2015
  8. Jun 5, 2015 #7

    OCR

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    What does...
    Mean.. ?
    DSCF0025.JPG

    DSCF1331.JPG

    DSCF1342.JPG

    DSCF0032.JPG


    Lol... :oldwink:
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2015
  9. Jun 5, 2015 #8

    WWGD

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    Still, I prefer to leave the driving ( or commuting) to someone else : public transportation.
     
  10. Jun 6, 2015 #9

    Mark44

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    Many of us out in the sticks are armed... Just sayin'. As far as wild animals go, virtually every time I go off into the mountains, especially the Olympics, we see black bears. They might scare the city slickers, but they don't scare me. I chase them away. On many trips I see mountain goats, herds of elk, and deer.
    Nope, there's plenty to keep us occupied. Seattle's the closest big city to me. Over the years, I've lived in about 10 places, each one farther away from Seattle, and now I'm about 40 miles away. The less I go there, the better I like it.
     
  11. Jun 6, 2015 #10

    Mark44

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    The trouble with that is that you can only go places that the public transportation goes. In the US West, unless you spend all your time in the major population centers, public transportation won't get you many places.
     
  12. Jun 6, 2015 #11

    WWGD

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    Good point, I guess I should say I like to live in cities large-enough and with a good-enough transportation system. I specially like to be able to work/study far from home and then be able to take a bus/subway home when I am tired.
     
    Last edited: Jun 6, 2015
  13. Jun 7, 2015 #12

    Maylis

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    I lived in Hong Kong for a while, and I think the population density was too stressful to be there forever. However, the issues that come up with country living is how inconvenient everything becomes when you have to drive so far to get anything. Pros and cons to both sides. A suburb might be a middle ground
     
  14. Jun 7, 2015 #13
    Sorry for the long post, please bear with me for a while:

    One study which I think would do excellent for research is: How many of a specific city mosquito population carry viruses within them vs those in a specific nearby forest (deep within the forest).

    I think it would make a good topic for research because I lived 18 years of my life in a forest with lots of mosquitoes and still never got a virus or any other disease from them. I even allowed some of them to bite me because I was a curious kid and amazed myself as I watched them fill their bellies with my blood. Excuse the emphasis again, but I NEVER got a virus or disease from them in those 18 years. It wasn't until I moved to the city and got bitten by them (from the city) that I got infected twice already with the same virus different type.

    Dammed mosquitoes from the city. IMO, they are filthier than those from the forest. It even hurts and itches when they bite you whereas when those from the forest bite you, you don't even notice.

    Bad filthy city, bad!

    If I were making such a study my hypothesis would be:
    Then I would prove it or disprove it in the research. But I'm not qualified to perform the research because I hate mosquitoes and I don't want that hate to influence the research. Someone else has to do it.

    EDIT:
    I think so too.
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2015
  15. Jun 8, 2015 #14

    Ryan_m_b

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    According by a report from the Office of National Statistics in 2010 life expectancy is longer in the UK countryside than the cities however the biggest determinator is wealth. The countryside has less deprived areas than the cities. This fits with another article a read last year (can't find it now) which reported those with the highest life expectancy in the UK life in the countryside but work in the cities (countryside is cheaper to live in and has more health benefits, city workers get paid more).

    With regards to what's better to live in on a personal level I grew up in a town I'd describe as on the edge of the countryside. From the edge you could look from a hill and see nothing but farms and villages to the horizon but the town itself had a population of a couple of tens of thousands. It was a horrible place to grow up. Don't get me wrong I loved my family home (and still do) as it was on the edge of town and playing in the woods was great but the actual place was a ghost town. There was nothing to do as a teenager and still to this day the town is dead. The town council is constantly trying to attract more businesses (at one point it had the most closed outlets per outlets of any place in the UK) but people still prefer to take their business elsewhere.

    Now I live in London and I wouldn't trade it for anything. Sure the city is more polluted but it's bustling! There's so much do to. Literally on any street near the centre you're likely to find a couple of interesting things and if there's nothing up your alley walk half a mile to the next area. There's so many people to meet, so many events to attend, so many interesting little cafes and parks and museums. It's fantastic.

    I like visiting the countryside for the greenery every now and then, but life in the city is so much more exciting.
     
  16. Jun 8, 2015 #15
    I'm actually having a hard time imagining a place with thousands of people being like a ghost town. Anyway, if it is calm place then I guess we have a difference of opinion. I want it there like right now. Silent and calm is my kind of place. :smile:
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 7, 2017
  17. Jun 8, 2015 #16

    Ryan_m_b

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    Ghost town in the sense that there is/was absolutely nothing to do. It's gotten better since I moved away approximately 8 years ago but when I grew up all the town was was a few square miles of residential estate (some of them very deprived) a town centre mostly consisting of boarded up shops and a hundred pubs to drink yourself to death in. Now there's a skatepark, a small theater and a few more pubs to drink yourself to death in. The woods and fields were great sure but the town had and still has a massive problem in the form of teenagers with nothing to do, which has led to a large teen drinking problem (exacerbated by years of town council "crack downs"). Honestly it wasn't some genteel peaceful countryside town, it's the remnants of a once prosperous market town economically destroyed by widespread car use and not-too far cities with far better attractions.

    I completely understand people's wish to live in the countryside and obviously not everywhere is like where I grew up but I'd argue that here in the UK there are a lot more dead towns than people think. Occasionally you see a documentary on it, once prosperous country towns now deprived due to easier access to nearby cities (and importantly not well situated on train lines to become commuter towns for said cities) but little has been done to fix the problem.
     
  18. Jun 8, 2015 #17

    WWGD

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    The Economist had an article on dying or decaying cities recently. It must be depressing to live in one.
     
  19. Jun 11, 2015 #18
    Hehe, beer is everywhere. :biggrin:
     
  20. Jun 12, 2015 #19
    Small towns in the USA are struggling to survive. I went on a quest to save my home town when I heard that the last store in town had closed.

    The best and brightest have left the small towns and the middle class have moved to the countryside. The countryside by the way doesn't necessarily mean there are any dangerous animals lurking about.

    It is up to the individual. The city life is just not for me. I don't need curbs and sidewalks or street lights that glare in my bedroom window.. I want to see the stars , hear an owl hooting, and a dog barking off in the distance all at the same time.

    If you watch an old moving that takes place in a rural setting, or a small town, just as it is getting dark, the owl and the dog barking in the distance will be heard. To me it sounds like the same dog and owl were used in all of the old movies. :)
     
  21. Jun 13, 2015 #20
    life expectancy in the country depends on your career. farmers have a much higher chance of horribly disfiguring accidents than a playwright would living in the country.
    people living in the city have more at hand medical services as well as health establishments like gyms and sport centers which can significantly change a persons life expectancy.the individual needs to use them though.as well as proximity can make the difference between surviving or not surviving some issue.
    the human body is exceptionally adaptive to its environment which can seriously mitigate the effects of things like smog and other pollutants.especially if the person has a healthy lifestyle to further bolster the body.
    being in the country does not mean a guaranteed longer life,the lifestyle has to be active too and although most people who live in the country tend to be active or more active because the country life tends to force more activities on its inhabitants a couch potato in the country is as likely to live a shorter life as a couch potato is in the city.
    to do a comparative study you'd need to compare apples to apples.
    the number of people you follow in the city should equal those in the country the levels of activity should be equal to each other as well as the levels of danger posed both by career and environment should be equal or proportional to each other. then you could see if either city or country life have an advantage on life expectancy.
     
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