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Tradition/Custom in your country

  1. Aug 23, 2006 #1
    What is interesting tradition or custom in your country ......like just for sake of example in Taiwan receiving a pine apple for a gift is a good omen for a business person.........
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 23, 2006 #2

    JasonRox

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    In Canada, if you have a son, it is tradition to make him play hockey and organized hockey for atleast 1 year at a relatively young age. If he has talent, he plays hockey and that's the end of the story.

    I think that's the only one we have.
     
  4. Aug 24, 2006 #3
    Being Swedish involves dancing around poles while singing about frogs without tails.
     
  5. Aug 24, 2006 #4

    FredGarvin

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    Too funny. True, but funny. I wish I could have started played at a young age. It would have made things a bit easier later.
     
  6. Aug 24, 2006 #5

    Chi Meson

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    In the US, if you hold a birthday party for your child, you are expected to organize several meaningless games that do not involve winning anything. Prizes must be given out to ever child guest that is there, no matter what level of participation.

    The party must have a theme (dinosaurs, pirates, etc) and the theme must be repeated constantly through the party in large and small ways (birthday cake in shape of ship, "walking the plank" game, "pillaging small village" project). Costumes are recommended, and these can be of the cheapest variety (paper plates and crayon masks, etc.)

    At least 2/3 of parents there must be videotaping the procedures at all times.

    All guests must bring presents that must attempt to hold to the appearance that the child is the one who picked out the present (which is also supposed to adhere to the theme).

    Throughout the event all children must be fed with sugar in as many of its forms as possible.

    At the end of the procedure, the host must provide the departing guest with a bag of theme-related junk that consists of several small pieces of plastic that are useless for any form of entertainment or education and will be thrown into a garbage receptacle within a week.

    Before these pieces are thrown out, a card must be sent to the host aknowledging the fun had by all at the party. The host must also send a card to each guest giving thanks for attendance.

    A second round of cards must be sent acknowledging recept of the first card and thanking guest/host for the nice thought contained within card.

    A third round of cards is currently optional.
     
  7. Aug 24, 2006 #6

    Kurdt

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    In the Uk we locked all our traditions in a safe place and then forgot where we put the key.

    Failing that we drink a lot of tea.
     
  8. Aug 24, 2006 #7
    You mean we try and lock it away but it keeps coming back to haunt us.

    A particularly persistent folk tradition or performance, is I think centred around the winter equinox(Samhain) , there's the lord who calls the shots, theres a dark figure(who represents death) generally behaves menacingly, another character, the fool seems to like winding him up though(what can I say he is a fool?) The fools job it is to create mischief and to bash people over the head with a cows bladder and talk rubbish(as far as I can tell he's meant to be the villiage idiot) And a few other representative figures which have something to do with the harvest, I seem to forget the details.

    Last time I saw this a couple of years ago it was quite an entertaining parade. If they followed the ceremony properly though the fool is crowned king over the lord and locked in a wicker cage where later he is burnt to death in sacrifice. Shame they didn't go the whole hog, but then I don't think they were real pagans anyway:smile:

    There's also the spring equinox as well (Beltain) Where young nubile women dance around a maypole - which represents guess what - in the hope that the gods will make them pregnant, well actually not these days people do it because it's traditional rather than any religous significance.

    And don't get me started on morris dancers.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2006
  9. Aug 24, 2006 #8

    Chi Meson

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    They have spread across the States, you know. Every vernal equinox, these guys collect on the top of local high points and do that...stuff...they do with the bells and ribbons and...you know. Every year it makes the local newspapers, again.
     
  10. Aug 24, 2006 #9

    JasonRox

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    Same here. My parents broke the tradition. :cry:

    I played hockey, but much too late. Believe or not, I talked to them about how they broke the unspoken law. :eek:
     
  11. Aug 24, 2006 #10

    I utterly despise birthdays. Such a stupid "holiday". And the ridiculous attitude that many people have "it's my birthday, I shouldn't have to do anything productive. Waaa." [/rant]

    Now, un-birthdays on the other hand :approve: .
     
  12. Aug 24, 2006 #11

    JasonRox

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    It gets annoying too.

    I always hear kids at work whining about working on their birthday when it's only a 4-5 hour shift that ends no later than 6.
     
  13. Aug 24, 2006 #12

    Lisa!

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    Well I prefer to be busy on my birthdday since I don't want to think of the day that all my troubles get started and also I don't find any great thing about getting older! :rolleyes:
     
  14. Aug 24, 2006 #13
    How old are you lisa?
     
  15. Aug 24, 2006 #14

    Lisa!

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    You don't know that's not polite to ask a lady how old she is?:grumpy: :devil:
     
  16. Aug 24, 2006 #15
    If your under 30, you can tell me your age. If you don't ill assume your over 30. :rolleyes:

    Not polite, why not? pfft.....
     
  17. Aug 24, 2006 #16
    but it is an important date, the earth circled the sun for a round number of years since you were born.

    to me, birthday is like a reminder that your life has been shortened by one year...


    about customs... we have our jewish customs here in israel(to most people its just the holidays...), and customs from different ethnic origins.
    but none are of the whole nation...
    my mom's origin is mrocco, there is a day when people from such origin gather togather in a food festival with sweet morocian recepies. though in my family we dont do that, we are too cynical i guess,like this whole country.
     
    Last edited: Aug 24, 2006
  18. Aug 24, 2006 #17

    Pythagorean

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    For me, Birthday is enlightenment period. I don't go out and party or celebrate (though friends try to get me to), I try to accept or acknowledge something about me that I want to change. It's like new years resolutions only it's personal and more intense, I guess.
     
  19. Aug 24, 2006 #18

    Lisa!

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    :confused:

    There's no mention of birthdays on OP!:biggrin:
    Under 50!o:)
     
  20. Aug 24, 2006 #19
    Hmmm between 30-50. No wonder you call me a kiddie all the time....

    I thought you were in your late 20's.
     
  21. Aug 24, 2006 #20

    Evo

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    I'm surprised no one has mentioned Halloween and Thanksgiving.
     
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