Transistor output

  • Thread starter sanado
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  • #1
sanado
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The question being referred to is question 3 on page 8:
http://www.itute.com/physicsline/phys_trial_exam1_2008v2.pdf

Answer referred to is Question 3 Area of Study 2:
http://www.itute.com/physicsline/phys_trial_exam1_2008v2sol.pdf

I don't understand why they get this answer. The answer I am getting is the exact same as them except shifted 3V down. This is because the DC part (given from the voltage divider) gives a middle point of 3V and when this is removed by capacitor 2, it will cause the voltage to be -3V? Can someone please explain why i am wrong and if not, why this answer is correct? Any help is appreciated...
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
kamerling
454
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The output capacitor will remove the DC part of the output signal. If the signal is 0 there is no DC part and the capacitor won't remove anything.
 
  • #3
sanado
56
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Okay, so before it enters the final capacitor, would the graph look like a simple straight line, due to clipping. Since this straight line is infact a DC voltage (it doesn't vary) due to the clipping, it is removed by the capacitor and as such, the V out is zero. Is that right?
 

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