Transition Energy in ev's Emitted wavelengths in m

In summary, the conversation discusses the calculation of the wavelength of a photon emitted during the electron transition from the second to first energy level in a hydrogen atom. The formula E=hf is provided and it is explained that frequency and wavelength are related. The speed of light is also discussed and its relationship to frequency and wavelength is shown. The correct frequency and wavelength for the given problem are calculated using Planck's constant in eV form. The conversation also briefly mentions the energy levels of a hydrogen atom and the formula for calculating the energy of each level.
  • #1
whiteshado
33
0
could i get help or a formula for this question please

Use the Energy Levels for Hydrogen to calculate the wavelength corresponding to the following electron transition
Transition Energy in ev's Emitted wavelengths in m
2->1______ ________x10______
 
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  • #2
Here's a formula you can use after you've discovered how many energy is contained in the photon emited during the transition of the electron

[tex]E=hf[/tex]

where f is the frequency of the photon. How are frequency and wavelenght related?
 
  • #3
taht is the question I am as stumped as you are tahts all the info i have i had taht equation though it doesn't haev wavelength also how do i find the energy?
 
  • #4
I don't think quasar is stumped, i think he was asking you a question which has an answer. The energy should be a given, or predicted by the bohr model. Think back to waves what other equation relates wavelength and frequency.
 
  • #5
well speed of sound divided by wavelength =frequency
 
  • #6
is taht what you were asking for?
 
  • #7
A photon travels at the speed of _____
 
  • #8
hf is the energy of the radiated photons

thats all i got
 
  • #9
Ok, a photon travels at the speed of light. If its energy is given by hF, then the relationship


c = (Frequency)(Wavelength) should give you its wavelength. All you ahve to do is find the energy drop from 2->1 and solve this equation and plug it into the E = hF one.
 
  • #10
whiteshado said:
well speed of sound divided by wavelength =frequency

This is also true for light. Light is a wave too, and a "photon" is only a fancy name we give to "little chuncks" (quanta!) of light.

So speed of light divided by wavelength =frequency.
 
  • #11
k so correct me if I am wrong 2-1 =-13.6 evs and w =-13.6evs/6.63e-34

?
 
  • #12
whiteshado said:
k so correct me if I am wrong 2-1 =-13.6 evs and w =-13.6evs/6.63e-34

?

-13.6 eV is the energy the electron has when it is in state n=1.

You're looking for the energy it has lost in going from state n=2 to state n=1, hence you want the difference between the energy of n=1 and the energy of n=2:

[tex]\Delta E = E_f - E_i[/tex]
 
  • #13
12.2? is that it? nope it was 10.2
 
Last edited:
  • #14
yeah.

-----------
 
  • #15
hmm i got 1.15e53
10.2/1.6e-19/6.63e-34
its not right thought i think i missed soemthing
wait is this is my freqwuancy correcT?
 
Last edited:
  • #16
1 kg = 1000 grams, so 2.3 kg = 2.3*1000 = 2300 grams.

Same thing here: 1 eV = 1.6*10^19 J, so 12.2 eV = 12.2*1.6*10^-19 J.
 
  • #17
ahhh i devided instead of multiplying
 
  • #18
In problems like this it's easier to use Planck's constant in eV instead of joules:

[tex]\frac {10.2 eV} {4.14 \times 10^{-15} eV \cdot seconds} [/tex]
 
  • #19
jtbell said:
In problems like this it's easier to use Planck's constant in eV instead of joules:

[tex]\frac {10.2 eV} {4.14 \times 10^{-15} eV \cdot seconds} [/tex]
=f=594574507617985878855444072835.38 correct?\
then speed of light/f=w
299 792 458/594574507617985878855444072835.38=5.04e-22

taht still doesn't give me the correct answer the correct answer is 1.22e-7
 
  • #20
Nope.It should be ~2.5 10^{15}Hz...And the wavelength ~1.22 10^{-7}m.

Daniel.
 
  • #21
ahh yes by useing Planck's constant in its original form thanks for the help again guys
 
  • #22
one mroe question on this the energy lvl of 3 in a hydrogen atom is -1.5 and lvl 1 is -13.6
though my graph shows the infinity sign and a 0.0 for where lvl 6 should be could i get the energy lvl of lvl 6 from someone? or how to get it
 
  • #23
U could have used the # given by J.T.I used,made that division correctly and wound up with the correct frequency...

Daniel.
 
  • #24
i did do taht after i posted and tried useing the constant in ev form
 
  • #25
whiteshado said:
one mroe question on this the energy lvl of 3 in a hydrogen atom is -1.5 and lvl 1 is -13.6
though my graph shows the infinity sign and a 0.0 for where lvl 6 should be could i get the energy lvl of lvl 6 from someone? or how to get it
How is [itex]E_n[/itex] related to [itex]E_1 = -13.6~eV[/itex] ?
 
  • #26
Gokul43201 said:
How is [itex]E_n[/itex] related to [itex]E_1 = -13.6~eV[/itex] ?
did i say that?
 
  • #27
No, I am. From E1, you can calculate E2, E3, ..., En, using a simple formula which relates the energy to the shell number (n). What is this formula ?
 

Related to Transition Energy in ev's Emitted wavelengths in m

1. What is transition energy in EVs?

Transition energy in EVs (electric vehicles) refers to the energy required for an electron to move from one energy level to another within an atom or molecule. In the context of EVs, it is often used to describe the energy required for an electron to move between energy levels in the battery, which powers the vehicle.

2. How is transition energy measured in EVs?

Transition energy in EVs is typically measured in electron volts (eV), which is a unit of energy equal to the energy an electron gains when it moves through a potential difference of one volt. This unit is commonly used in physics and chemistry to express the energy of subatomic particles and chemical reactions.

3. What are emitted wavelengths in m?

Emitted wavelengths in m (meters) refer to the wavelengths of light or other electromagnetic radiation emitted by a source, such as an EV battery. Wavelength is a measure of the distance between two consecutive peaks or troughs in a wave, and it is often expressed in meters (m) in scientific contexts.

4. How are transition energy and emitted wavelengths related in EVs?

In EVs, the transition energy between energy levels in the battery is directly related to the wavelengths of light or electromagnetic radiation emitted as the battery discharges. This relationship follows the principles of quantum mechanics, where the energy of a photon (a particle of light) is directly proportional to its frequency (and inversely proportional to its wavelength).

5. What are some practical applications of understanding transition energy and emitted wavelengths in EVs?

Understanding transition energy and emitted wavelengths in EVs can help scientists and engineers develop more efficient and sustainable battery technologies. It can also aid in the design and optimization of electric vehicle charging systems. Additionally, this knowledge can inform the development of new diagnostic tools and techniques for monitoring the health and performance of EV batteries.

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