Transition to college questions.

In summary, the decision between taking courses concurrently at a community college or taking AP classes at your high school should be based on which option will best prepare you for your future studies in physics or applied mathematics.
  • #1
logickills
28
0
Hey PF,

So I am a junior in high school and am highly interested in physics and mathematics. I really want to go to college for something in this general area. I am really conflicted between taking courses concurrently at a community college, or taking them at my high school. More specifically I am speaking of mathematics courses. I want to take Calculus and Analytical Geometry I this summer and continue from there at the community college. If I do this right by the time I enter college I should be in Calculus and Analytical Geometry III. The only problem is that several of my teachers at my high school have said I should take the AP calc class at my school because it "looks better". My train of thought however is that as long as I get into college looking "better" isn't a big deal. The most important thing is my strength in mathematics, especially if I want to pursue to study in the area of Physics or Applied Mathematics.

What is your opinion on the subject?

Thanks in advance.
 
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  • #2
My opinion is that it really depends on your situation. If you are able to keep up with the workload of taking courses concurrently at a community college, then that might be your best option if it will allow you to get ahead in your math classes and take more advanced coursework when you go to college. However, if taking AP classes at your high school will give you the opportunity to demonstrate your proficiency in math to college admissions officers, then it might be worth considering as well. Ultimately, what matters most is that you take courses that are challenging and that will help you grow and develop as a student.
 
  • #3


I understand the importance of making informed decisions, especially when it comes to education and career paths. Based on your interest in physics and mathematics, it seems like taking courses at a community college would be a beneficial choice for you. Community colleges often offer a wider range of courses and are more affordable, allowing you to explore different subjects and potentially save money in the long run. Additionally, taking Calculus and Analytical Geometry I this summer and continuing on to Calculus and Analytical Geometry III by the time you enter college shows a strong dedication to your studies and a strong foundation in these subjects.

While taking AP classes may look impressive on college applications, what is most important is your understanding and proficiency in the subject matter. If you feel that taking these courses at a community college will better prepare you for your future studies in physics or applied mathematics, then that is the route you should take. Ultimately, it is important to prioritize your own academic growth and success rather than what may look good on paper. I wish you the best of luck in your academic journey.
 

Related to Transition to college questions.

1. What should I expect in terms of academic rigor in college?

College courses are generally more challenging and fast-paced than high school courses. You will have more responsibility for managing your time and completing assignments on your own. It is important to attend all classes, take good notes, and seek help from professors or tutors if needed.

2. How do I choose the right college for me?

When choosing a college, consider factors such as location, size, academic programs, campus culture, and cost. Visit different colleges, talk to current students and alumni, and research each school's admissions requirements and job placement rates to find the best fit for your needs and goals.

3. How can I prepare for the social aspects of college?

College is a great opportunity to meet new people and make friends, but it can also be overwhelming for some. Joining clubs and organizations, attending events and orientations, and reaching out to classmates are all great ways to get involved and build a social network on campus.

4. What should I do if I feel homesick?

It is common to feel homesick when transitioning to college, especially if you are living far from home. Stay in touch with family and friends through phone calls, video chats, or visits. Also, try to get involved in campus activities and build new connections to help ease feelings of homesickness.

5. How can I manage my finances while in college?

It is important to create a budget and stick to it while in college. Make a list of your necessary expenses, such as tuition, books, and housing, and prioritize your spending accordingly. Look for scholarship and financial aid opportunities, and consider getting a part-time job to help cover expenses.

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