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Translational Acceleration

  1. Nov 5, 2013 #1
    I have a physics problem that is asking about translational acceleration... it says this:

    "What is the magnitude of the translational acceleration at a point on the rim at t=10?"

    Is this referring to a=(r)(alpha)

    or is it referring to:

    a=(a_t^2+a_c^2)^1/2
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Nov 5, 2013 #2

    tiny-tim

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    hi studentofphy! :smile:
    hmm … "translational acceleration" is normally used as being the opposite of "rotational acceleration" …

    it applies to a rigid body, and it means the acceleration of the centre of mass, as opposed to the angular acceleration about the centre of mass

    i honestly don't see how you apply it to a point :redface:

    my guess is that it means "transverse acceleration" (ie "tangential acceleration")

    but it could mean the full acceleration (since obviously the angular accelearrtoin of a point about itself is irrelevant)​
     
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