Transmission coefficient

  1. Dec 26, 2012 #1
    Hi

    I have a question on the transmission coefficient in classical optics. When we say that a medium has a transmittance of e.g. 99%, then 99% of the incident light intensity is transmitted. But will the light also acquire a phase?

    I tried searching the web, but all I found was this Wiki-article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Propagation_constant. There it states that the propagation constant has an imaginary term (=phase), but does it also apply to the case I described?

    Best,
    Niles.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 26, 2012 #2

    mfb

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    Staff: Mentor

    If just the transmittance is given, I don't see a way to determine the phase shift (if present).
     
  4. Dec 27, 2012 #3
    the phases of light(incident,reflected,transmitted) at the point where it strikes must be equal.it induces some phase relationship for these waves.
     
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