Tricky integral

  • Thread starter jbowers9
  • Start date
  • #1
jbowers9
89
1

Homework Statement


I recently tried to do the following integral:
an = ∫√(2/a) sin(n∏x/a) cosh(x) dx
x=0 to x=a

Homework Equations


an = ∫√(2/a) sin(βx) cosh(x) dx
β = n∏/a
sin(βx) = ½i(eiβx – e-iβx)
cosh(x) = ½(ex + e-x)

The Attempt at a Solution



an = ¼ i √(2/a)∫ (eiβx – e-iβx) (ex + e-x)

after all is said and done, I get;

an = √(2/a)[(a2sin(n∏)sinh(a) – acos(n∏)cosh(a) + n∏a)/(n22 + a2)]


The text, “Quantum Mechanics Demystified”, however, gets;

an = √(2/a)[a(n∏cos(n∏)cosh(a) + sin(n∏)sinh(a))/( n22 + a2)]

Which is correct? And why?

Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution

 
Last edited:

Answers and Replies

  • #2
36,316
8,284

Homework Statement


I recently tried to do the following integral:
an = ∫√(2/a) sin(n∏x/a) cosh(x) dx
x=0 to x=a

Homework Equations


an = ∫√(2/a) sin(βx) cosh(x) dx
β = n∏/a
sin(βx) = ½i(eiβx – e-iβx)
cosh(x) = ½(ex – e-x)

The Attempt at a Solution



an = ¼ i √(2/a)∫ (eiβx – e-iβx) (ex – e-x)

after all is said and done, I get;

an = √(2/a)[(a2sin(n∏)sinh(a) – acos(n∏)cosh(a) + n∏a)/(n22 + a2)]


The text, “Quantum Mechanics Demystified”, however, gets;

an = √(2/a)[a(n∏cos(n∏)cosh(a) + sin(n∏)sinh(a))/( n22 + a2)]

Which is correct? And why?

Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


Homework Statement





Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution


Your approach is the one I would take, so here is what I would do:

Check your work to see if you can find any errors.
Take the derivative of your result. Do you get the integrand?
Take the derivative of the book's result. Do you get the integrand?
If the answers to both questions are yes, the two antiderivatives are equal or differ by a constant.
If one answer is yes and the other is no, the result from the "yes" answer is almost surely correct and the other is incorrect. It's even possible that the answer in the book is wrong.
 
  • #3
gabbagabbahey
Homework Helper
Gold Member
5,002
7

Homework Statement


I recently tried to do the following integral:
an = ∫√(2/a) sin(n∏x/a) cosh(x) dx
x=0 to x=a

The Attempt at a Solution



I get;

an = √(2/a)[(a2sin(n∏)sinh(a) – acos(n∏)cosh(a) + n∏a)/(n22 + a2)]

If you've written the Integral correctly, then your solution is closer than the one from the text; it should have an aSin(....) term instead of an a2Sin(...)....Of course, if n is an integer then the sin (n*pi) term is zero and cos(n*pi)=(-1)n.

So, are you sure you are evaluating the correct integral?
 
  • #4
gabbagabbahey
Homework Helper
Gold Member
5,002
7
Your approach is the one I would take, so here is what I would do:

Check your work to see if you can find any errors.
Take the derivative of your result. Do you get the integrand?
Take the derivative of the book's result. Do you get the integrand?
If the answers to both questions are yes, the two antiderivatives are equal or differ by a constant.
If one answer is yes and the other is no, the result from the "yes" answer is almost surely correct and the other is incorrect. It's even possible that the answer in the book is wrong.

Usually these are good strategies for checking a solution, but in this case the integral is a definite integral, so differentiating the textbook's solution will naturally give zero.
 
  • #5
jbowers9
89
1
I made an error transcribing the above and corrected the cosh(x) term. I've redone it 3 times and still get my results.
 

Suggested for: Tricky integral

Replies
5
Views
129
Replies
32
Views
922
  • Last Post
Replies
7
Views
117
  • Last Post
Replies
6
Views
728
  • Last Post
Replies
10
Views
894
  • Last Post
Replies
5
Views
336
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
159
Replies
11
Views
303
  • Last Post
Replies
16
Views
664
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
308
Top