Tricky questions

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  • #26
256bits
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OK Here's another one.

BONUS. Worth 10 points.
If a person can run a mile in 4 minutes,
How long does it take 5 people to run a mile?
4 minutes

If you got that one correct, you can attempt this one.
MEGA BONUS: Triple your score.
Beware. An incorrect answer and you deduct triple score points.
If a man can dg a hole in 1 hour, how long does it take 10 men to dig a hole?
an hour -
 
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  • #27
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OK Here's another one.

BONUS. Worth 10 points.
If a person can run a mile in 4 minutes,
How long does it take 5 people to run a mile?
4min
If you got that one correct, you can attempt this one.
MEGA BONUS: Triple your score.
Beware. An incorrect answer and you deduct triple score points.
If a man can dg a hole in 1 hour, how long does it take 10 men to dig a hole?
It depends whether it's the same hole or different ... (and if they dig at the same rate or not) [Thus could be 6min or 1hr ... (?)]
 
  • #28
256bits
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4min

It depends whether it's the same hole or different ... (and if they dig at the same rate or not) [Thus could be 6min or 1hr ... (?)]
Jeez. I don't know if you now get the TRIPLE Bonus , or NEGATIVE Bonus .:confused: or both, if it all equals out with two answers.:biggrin:
 
  • #29
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Jeez. I don't know if you now get the TRIPLE Bonus , or NEGATIVE Bonus .:confused: or both, if it all equals out with two answers.:biggrin:
Lol
Whatever you decide. You're the boss ...
[But since my reply covered the answer ... ...]
 
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  • #30
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There are simple, mundane sentences in the English language that can be correctly spoken but not written. Give an example.
Nice one. I will try to add a complementary question to that compliment: There are simple sentences in the English language that are sensible when written but not when spoken. Give an example.

How do you pronounce "Qwfwq"?
What is the name of the œ symbol?

(I feel like there might be a more compelling way to word the question, or that there might be more compelling examples.)
 
  • #31
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Show that a grammatically correct sentence in English with the word "and" in it five times in succession, with no other words in between.

A signmaker is asked to make a sign for a bakery, with the phrase "Pies and Cakes" on the sign.
The signmaker asks the baker, "How much space should I leave between Pies and and and and and Cakes?
 
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  • #32
BillTre
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There are simple sentences in the English language that are sensible when written but not when spoken. Give an example.
There are 10 kinds of people in the world,
those that understand binary and those that don't.
 
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  • #33
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There are 10 kinds of people in the world,
those that understand binary and those that don't.
There are two kinds of people - those who are sometimes too kind and those who sometimes are kind too.
 
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  • #34
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There are two kinds of people - those who are sometimes too kind and those who sometimes are kind too.
There are two kinds of people, those who believe there are two kinds of people, and those who don't believe it.
 
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  • #35
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Add punctuation to make this make sense:
Bob, where Alice had had had had had had had had had had had a better effect on the teacher

Bob, where Alice had had "had," had had "had had." "Had had" had had a better effect on the teacher.
 
  • #36
DaveC426913
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Show that a grammatically correct sentence in English with the word "and" in it five times in succession, with no other words in between.

A signmaker is asked to make a sign for a bakery, with the phrase "Pies and Cakes" on the sign.
The signmaker asks the baker, "How much space should I leave between Pies and and and and and Cakes?
Add punctuation to make this make sense:
Bob, where Alice had had had had had had had had had had had a better effect on the teacher

Bob, where Alice had had "had," had had "had had." "Had had" had had a better effect on the teacher.
Ooh! 11! That's even better than my version, which only got up to 8 hads.
 

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