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Trig graphs

  1. Jun 3, 2013 #1
    Quick question guys..
    I understand how trig graphs work (cos, sin, tan etc.). What I don't understand is when there is a horizontal translation of say, pi/4, I notice that the graph moves, but I don't really understand how to know exactly how far to move. For example if your HT was pi/4 and your graph was extended on the x axis -2pi -> 2pi, and the original graph crossed once at -2pi, then where would the new point hit when you apply the translation?

    Sorry if that was confusing, any help is appreciated!
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jun 3, 2013 #2

    CAF123

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    Gold Member

    Unless I have misunderstood your question if the original graph intersected x axis at ##-2\pi## and the translation was ##\pi/4## to the right, then the graph would then intersect at simply ##-2\pi + \pi/4##. If it was translated to the left, then it would be ##-2\pi - \pi/4##, but this would be outwith your restricted domain ##[-2\pi, 2\pi]##
     
  4. Jun 3, 2013 #3

    verty

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    Homework Helper

    I'll help with an example.

    ##f(x) = x^2##
    ##g(x) = (x - 1)^2 + 3##

    ##g(x)## is a translated copy of ##f(x)##. How far has it been translated and in which direction? Draw the graphs of ##f## and ##g## if you are not sure.

    Then try with ##f(x) = 1/x## and ##g(x) = 1/(x - 2) + 3##. Draw these graphs. Do they have the same shape?
     
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