Trig identities

  1. 1. The problem statement, all variables and given/known data

    Prove this identity


    m) Sin^2 x / sin^2 x + cos x^2 = tan^2 x / 1 + tan^ x
    2. Relevant equations

    http://i52.tinypic.com/105tdtk.jpg Letter (m) on the top

    3. The attempt at a solution


    I dont know to much about trig identities, he barely taught anything. But apparently 1 is = to cos/cos and plenty of other things.

    I tried to solve the right side, the first thing i did was turn the 1 into sin^ x + cos ^ x.

    Then i turned the denominator into 1-sin^x - 1 + cos^x by subbing the values of cos^x , since cos^x = 1 - sin^2 .

    I know that tan^x = sin^x / cos^x , but the things that I am subbing in keep cancelling eachother out, does anyone know how to solve this?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
    Homework Helper

    Letter m is

    [tex]\frac{1+tan^2x}{1-tan^2x} = \frac{1}{cos^2x-sin^2x}[/tex]


    If you take the left side and divide both the numerator and denominator by cos2x what will you get?
     
  4. Divide the tan bracket by cos^2x?

    you would get the original tan bracket, with a division of cos^2x ....
     
  5. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
    Homework Helper

    Sorry, wrong operation.

    rewrite tanx as sin/cosx and then multiply the numerator and denominator by cos2x. It should easily work out.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2011
  6. Its not tan x though, Its 1 + tan^2x , cant write tan^2x as sin/cos
     
  7. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
    Homework Helper

    tanx = sinx/cosx

    squaring both sides

    tan2x = (sinx/cosx)2 = ?
     
  8. tru, i dont get what to do when theres a 1. it seem as tho sometimes people change the 1 into sinx^2 + cosx^2, sometimes they keep the one, honostly I dont even get how to do it. Am i always looking at both side of the equation? or just focusing on one? If i pick leftside do i ignore right side to the extent of just trying to solve for it? wth do i do with the ones?
     
  9. SammyS

    SammyS 8,432
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
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    How about: taking the left side and multiplying [STRIKE]divide[/STRIKE] both the numerator and denominator by cos2x ?
     
  10. does 1 - sin = cos?
     
  11. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
    Homework Helper

    No. But 1-sin2x=cos2x
     
  12. f) 2sin^2x - 1 = sin^2 x - cos^2 x

    I dont know how to solve this.

    I tried taking the right side and simplyiing it to 1-cos^2x -1 - sin^2x ... then didnt know where to go with it,

    And I have no idea where to even begin with the left side.
     
  13. Can anyone tell me if i did this question right?

    It goes :: 1 / cosx - cosx = sinx*tanx

    I took the right side and simplified it to 1-cosx.


    Then i took the left side and multiplied the lone cos value with cos to give me

    1/cos - cos^2x / cos

    1 / cos - cos^2x / cos

    1-cos^2x / cos

    = 1 - cos.

    ls = rs

    Is this correct?
     
  14. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
    Homework Helper

    If you take the left side, what can you replace '1' by? (something with sine and cosine in it)

    That is one way to do it, but you should generally use one side and prove the other.
     
  15. Are you ever supposed to recipricol subtraction into addition? Or is it jus for division into multiplication?
     
  16. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
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    I am not sure what you mean by that.

    When you multiply the numerator and denominator by the same quantity you are essentually multiplying by 1.
     
  17. Is this one right?

    I solved it two ways, but im uncertain if one of these ways is right or not.

    f) Tan^2x - sin^2x = sin^2x*tan^2x

    First:

    Sin^2x
    ________ - 1-cos^2x = 1-cos^2x + sin^2x / cos^2x
    cos^2x


    ^ factor out the negetive from the cos^2x
    Sin^2x - 1

    rs- cancel out the two cos^2x, and factor out the negitive giving -1 sin^2x in the end.

    Ls = sin^2x -1 , rs = -1cos^2x

    Ls = RS?

    The other way is the way the teacher did it, just solving one side. etc.
     
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2011
  18. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
    Homework Helper

    You could take this and then bring them both down the same denominator of cosx.
     
  19. Like... when you have division, you take the term on the right and flip it,, do you do that for subtraction into addition as wel?

    I edited my last post for a different question, please take a look @ it.
     
  20. rock.freak667

    rock.freak667 6,228
    Homework Helper

    It seems like you are working with both sides at the same time. It is better to just take one side and use that side to prove the other. How you wrote it is confusing.


    Sin^2x
    ________ - 1-cos^2x = 1-cos^2x + sin^2x / cos^2x
    cos^2x

    From

    [tex]\frac{sin^2x}{cos^2x} - (1-cos^2x) = \frac{sin^2x}{cos^2x} -sin^2x[/tex]

    best to not change sin2x as yet. If you factor out the sin2x, what are you left with?

    Can you see an identity that will help to get tan2x?
     
  21. I already have that one solved, was just wondering if my way is valid to. And yes i know, my teaccher doesnt care though.

    How about this one?

    1/sinx^2x + 1/cos^2x = 1/sin^2x*cos^2x

    I tried turning 1/sin^2x into cosecent^2x + secent^x = 1/sin^2x*cos^2x

    Also just converted the two values at the bottom into 1-cos^2x and 1-sin^2x , however i dont understand how they are turned into multiplication on the right side?
     
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