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Trigonometry functions

  1. Sep 8, 2004 #1
    hello everyone,
    well my story is a bit complicated..
    since i've entered school i was french educated,
    now i'm in my last year and i'm moving to an english school
    and i'm in the field GS (general sciences)
    the reason for moving schools is that i'm travelling to canada next year
    to study "astrophysics"..

    anyway my question is:
    when i was looking at the trigonometry chapter,
    i noticed the SEC and the CSC functions
    which i discovered their meanings: secx= 1/cosx
    and cscx= 1/sinx

    and i was astonished because there's no SEC and CSC in french.
    i asked grade 11 students in english schools, they told me that they know it
    and i asked french educated students in grade 12.. but they don't know it.

    are these functions only used in english?

    thanks for any help
    joe
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 8, 2004 #2

    arildno

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    Welcome to PF!
    These function-names are also used in Scandinavia, and in Germany as well, I believe.
     
  4. Sep 8, 2004 #3
    And in all the Arabic countries.
     
  5. Sep 8, 2004 #4
    thankss

    thanks,
    you were so cooperative

    regards,
    joe
     
  6. Sep 8, 2004 #5
    im sorry



    i live in lebanon (arabic country)

    and we don't use them.
     
  7. Sep 8, 2004 #6
    They are pretty much non-existant in Sweden.
     
  8. Sep 8, 2004 #7

    arildno

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    Hmm..the Swedes always have their own, strange incomprehensible ways of doing things..
     
  9. Sep 8, 2004 #8
    ???

    it's so wierd

    it's all about contradictions
     
  10. Sep 8, 2004 #9
  11. Sep 8, 2004 #10
    Ah yes, writing 1/cos(x) instead of sec(x) is incomprehensible for you feeble-minded Norwegians...

    ;)
     
  12. Sep 8, 2004 #11

    arildno

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    FEEBLE-MINDED??
    WE ARE MASTERS OF BOTH TECHNIQUES; BESIDES, YOU HAVEN'T GOT ANY OIL OR MERCHANT FLEET TO SPEAK OF!!
     
  13. Sep 8, 2004 #12
    You just said that "our" way was "incomprehensible". How typically Norwegian, you're all like John Kerry.

    At least we don't speak as odd as you do, era jäkla brusefåtöljer.

    :P
     
    Last edited: Sep 8, 2004
  14. Sep 8, 2004 #13

    arildno

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    brusefåtøljer??
     
  15. Sep 8, 2004 #14
    Legend has it that brusefåtölj ("noisy chair", I suppose) is Norwegian for "toilet" (yes, I know it's not true).
     
  16. Sep 8, 2004 #15

    arildno

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    Is this some kind of strange, Swedish compliment :confused:

    After all, as is well known, Swedes still dump their bodily refuse in their backyards..
     
  17. Sep 8, 2004 #16

    Integral

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    Where's the Dane to complete this Scandinavian insult session?

    It never occurred to me that the Sec and Csc, which are pretty rarely used BTW, were not universal!
     
  18. Sep 8, 2004 #17

    matt grime

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    I've a surname of Scandinavian descent, can I join in? However the only things I knew how to say in Danish was "hard boiled egg" (and some isolated words from Peter Hoeg novels), and I've forgotten that. You'd have to be incredibly thin skinned to find that insulting.
     
  19. Sep 9, 2004 #18
    lol.. we are talking about trigs
    don't forget ! :P
     
  20. Sep 10, 2004 #19
    ah but

    Lebanon has a French influence :-)
     
  21. Sep 10, 2004 #20

    Tide

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    Wasn't the Scandinavian Trigva Lie the first Secretary General of the U.N.? ;-)
     
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