1. Not finding help here? Sign up for a free 30min tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Triple integration problem

  1. Oct 14, 2011 #1
    Find the volume lying below z = 3 - 2y and above z = x^2 + y^2.

    How would I go about finding the limits of integration for this problem?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 14, 2011 #2

    LCKurtz

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    Set the z's equal and plot the resulting xy equation in the xy plane to figure out the limits.
     
  4. Oct 14, 2011 #3
    Thanks.

    What if the question did not specify that z = 3 - 2y was above z = x^2 + y^2? How would I determine that it was in fact above it? I'm having some trouble visualizing all of this in 3 dimensions.
     
  5. Oct 14, 2011 #4

    LCKurtz

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Gold Member

    The usual way to help visualize things like this is to draw a picture of the surface. You should be able to recognize one as a paraboloid and the other a plane.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Triple integration problem
  1. Triple Integral problem (Replies: 11)

Loading...