Troubleshooting 9V and 1 Ohm Resistor Connection

In summary, you are trying to connect a 9 volt battery to a 1 ohm resistor. When you do this, you cannot read the ammeter because the current is too high. You can check the resistor by using your multimeter in the resistance mode. If the resistor is still good, you are probably using a dry cell battery. If the resistor is not good, you may have destroyed the battery first.
  • #1
danne89
180
0
Hi! I connect 9 volts to a 1 ohm resistor and thought I would get I = U/R = 9 A. But when I connect the ampmeter, I cannot read anything! Where is the problem?
 
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  • #2
What 9 V voltage source are you using? Is it a dry cell or a lab power source?
How do you connect the ammeter to test the current?
 
  • #3
You're probably just connecting the ammeter incorrectly. Besides, a 9-volt dry cell will not be able to produce 9 amperes of current.

- Warren
 
  • #4
A standard resistor is designed to handle anywhere from 0.25W to about 1 watt. Unless you used a power resistor, you've toasted your resistor (at full current, you're trying to make 81 watts !). You can check if the resistor is still any good by using your multimeter in the resistance mode. This would be the mode of failure if you used a DC power supply. If you used a dry cell (9V battery), I'm not sure which you would have destroyed first, the battery or the resistor. Check the open circuit voltage of the battery to see if it's still any good.

Lessons you have learned :

1. Batteries can drive only so much current. You can kill a bettery by shorting it with a low resistance. Look up the specs for the battery to see what it's rated to deliver, before using it under doubtful conditions.

2. Resistors can handle only so much power. Again, make sure you are not going to exceed design constraints before hooking up a circuit.
 
  • #5
But how can I determ from the battery how many amps it will deliver?
 
  • #6
BTW, I connect like this. Battery plus -> Resistor -> Ampmeter plus -> Ampmeter minus -> Battery minus
 
  • #7
danne89 said:
But how can I determ from the battery how many amps it will deliver?
You can look up the Equivalent Series Resistance of the battery. A battery can be considered an ideal voltage source (which could provide an infinite amount of current) in series with a resistor. This series resistor limits the total current the battery can deliver. If you look up the ESR, you can calculate the maximum possible current.

- Warren
 
  • #8
I also assume you are using a small rectangular 9 volt battery but cannot be sure since you have not said. So what's the story? Is it or isn't it? If not, what is it?
 
  • #9
Since you did not specify what type of voltage source you are using, we are only guessing that it is Vdc. (It could be a Vac source, where you may also be learning about RMS, peak and peak-to-peak voltages).

Once you have confirmed that your voltage source is still working, (by testing it with your voltmeter and making sure you also select the appropriate Vdc or Vac range depending on your source, here is a new experiment to try;

using the same voltage source, replace you [tex] 1\Omega [/tex] resistor with a [tex] 500\Omega [/tex] or [tex] 100\Omega [/tex] resistor and measure current.

(hint: you might calculate ahead of time what current you expect, so you will know what range to set your ammeter to. If you are still uncertain and you want to protect your ammeter from unexpected currents, start with the largest range and work your way down to smaller ranges. Open your circuit between switching to a new range)
 
  • #10
Now it seems to work. Thanks
 
  • #11
danne89 said:
Now it seems to work. Thanks
Glad we could steer you in the right direction. Though I don't quite understand what you mean by "seems to work" (My circuits either work or don't work). Do you mean you are fuzzy about how your circuit presently works? :confused:
 
  • #12
It's working perfectly. I just expressed myself a little sloppy.
 

Related to Troubleshooting 9V and 1 Ohm Resistor Connection

What is the purpose of troubleshooting a 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection?

The purpose of troubleshooting a 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection is to identify and resolve any issues or problems that may be preventing the connection from functioning properly. This could include issues such as loose or damaged wires, incorrect wiring, or faulty components.

What are some common problems that can occur with a 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection?

Some common problems that can occur with a 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection include a lack of power or voltage, incorrect resistance readings, and short circuits. These issues can be caused by a variety of factors such as faulty components, incorrect wiring, or poor connections.

How can I troubleshoot a 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection?

To troubleshoot a 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection, you can follow a few steps. First, check all of the connections and make sure they are secure and free of any damage. Next, use a multimeter to test the voltage and resistance readings at various points in the circuit. If there is a problem, the multimeter will help you pinpoint where the issue is occurring. Finally, try replacing any potentially faulty components to see if that resolves the issue.

What should I do if I can't find the source of the problem with my 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection?

If you are unable to find the source of the problem with your 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection, it may be helpful to consult a professional or someone with more experience in electronics. They may be able to offer additional troubleshooting tips or help you identify the issue more quickly.

How can I prevent future issues with my 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection?

To prevent future issues with your 9V and 1 Ohm resistor connection, make sure to use high-quality components and follow proper wiring techniques. Regularly checking and maintaining your connections can also help prevent any potential problems. Additionally, it may be helpful to consult online resources or seek advice from experts in the field for tips on troubleshooting and preventing issues with your specific circuit.

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